Economic crisis in Sri Lanka: the embassies are closed, the government of Rajapaksa loses the majority | world news

Fueled by anger over food and fuel shortages and power cuts, people continued to protest the government led by Gotabaya Rajapaksa and demanded that his entire family resign over their handling of the heavily indebted economy. .

Sri Lanka’s economic crisis has turned into political unrest, days after the public demonstrated outside President Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s house in the capital Colombo. Dozens of Sri Lankan lawmakers left the ruling coalition on Tuesday, leaving Rajapaksa’s government with fewer than the 113 members needed to maintain a majority in the 225-member chamber. Fueled by anger over food and fuel shortages and power cuts, people continued to protest the government led by Gotabaya Rajapaksa and demanded that his entire family resign over their handling of the heavily indebted economy. .


Here are the main updates on the crisis in Sri Lanka:

> In a setback for the Sri Lankan government, Finance Minister Ali Sabry resigned within 24 hours of his appointment and ahead of crucial talks scheduled with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for a loan program to help the country out of its worst economic crisis.

>Massive protests took place outside Sri Lanka’s parliament on Tuesday as protesters continued to demand Rajapaksa’s resignation amid the country’s worst economic crisis in decades.

> The United States, meanwhile, expressed concern about the economic situation in Sri Lanka and urged the island nation’s authorities to exercise restraint and avoid blackouts on social media. “We are deeply concerned about the economic situation in Sri Lanka. Everyone has the right to demonstrate peacefully and express their opinions. tweeted State Department spokesman Ned Price.


Read also | “There may be a bloodbath…”: warning from the MPs of the ruling coalition in Sri Lanka

> Cash-strapped Sri Lanka has decided to temporarily close its embassies in Norway and Iraq, as well as the country’s Consulate General in Sydney, amid the ongoing crisis in the country. The decision will take effect from April 30, said a statement from its foreign ministry.

>A group of lawmakers from Sri Lanka’s ruling party have called for the appointment of an interim government, warning that failure to do so will lead to violence and lawlessness.

> The 36-hour curfew – imposed in Sri Lanka following public unrest outside the president’s home – was lifted on Monday. The country, however, continues to operate under a state of emergency.


> India recently announced a $1 billion line of credit to Sri Lanka as part of its financial assistance to the country to deal with the economic crisis, following a previous $500 billion line of credit dollars in February to help him buy petroleum products.

(With agency contributions)



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