covid pandemic – GUWIV http://guwiv.com/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 00:05:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://guwiv.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/guw-150x150.png covid pandemic – GUWIV http://guwiv.com/ 32 32 Protecting poor children from the impending food crisis – News https://guwiv.com/protecting-poor-children-from-the-impending-food-crisis-news/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 19:49:15 +0000 https://guwiv.com/protecting-poor-children-from-the-impending-food-crisis-news/ The crisis in the global wheat and maize market has caused food inflation in sub-Saharan Africa to rise by 11% PA By Biniam Bedasso Published: Wed 16 Mar 2022, 11:49 PM Russia’s attack on Ukraine threatens to further disrupt the global food system by dramatically increasing the cost of staple foods and the energy needed […]]]>

The crisis in the global wheat and maize market has caused food inflation in sub-Saharan Africa to rise by 11%



PA

By Biniam Bedasso

Published: Wed 16 Mar 2022, 11:49 PM

Russia’s attack on Ukraine threatens to further disrupt the global food system by dramatically increasing the cost of staple foods and the energy needed to transport them. The Black Sea region is responsible for exporting at least 12% of global food calories, so cutting off access will have far-reaching effects.

Food prices were already skyrocketing due to post-pandemic market imbalances and supply chain pressures, as well as climate-related production losses. By the end of last year, the crisis in the world market for wheat and maize had pushed up food inflation in sub-Saharan Africa by 11%. Now poor countries face another shock at a time when they have little room to accommodate it.

Even before the economic crisis caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, vulnerable households in developing countries devoted a significant part of their budget to food. Further increases in the cost of food could lead children in these households to suffer significant and irreversible nutritional losses. They might go to school hungry or even drop out to help supplement their family’s income. Given the massive learning losses suffered by children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) due to pandemic-related school closures, any further disruption could have devastating consequences.

Fortunately, most countries have a proven tool to protect their most vulnerable children in these circumstances. School meal programs are considered the largest social safety net in the world. Before the pandemic, these programs reached 388 million children in 161 countries.

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There is ample evidence that the provision of school meals is an important tool to keep poor and vulnerable children in class in food insecure areas. This is true even during systemic shocks such as droughts which can affect the overall food supply. Many developing countries recognized the value of school meals as a tool for social protection when global food prices soared following the global financial crisis of 2008. Over the past decade, a growing number of PRITI have integrated school meals into their national budgets as a cost-effective way to improve the health and educational outcomes of schoolchildren.

In the context of rising food and fuel prices, buying food in bulk and preparing meals in a school can potentially generate economies of scale and efficiency that help reduce overall costs. . A recent study based on the National School Lunch Program in the United States shows that school nutrition programs help lower prices in grocery stores by reducing private food purchases.

Countries exposed to the negative effects of the current turmoil in food and energy markets should strive to strengthen these programs. But consistently providing nutritious school meals to a significant portion of the school population can nonetheless be prohibitively expensive for countries with limited resources. A rough calculation based on data from the Global Child Nutrition Foundation indicates that to expand coverage of school meals programs in LMICs at the current global median level would require the equivalent of 5% of the global education budget of a country.

One of the first steps countries can take to stabilize and eventually expand school meals programs is to improve the efficiency and ensure accountability of existing programs. Developing countries have seen many noble public sector initiatives that began with much promise, only to succumb to mismanagement and eroded public trust.

School meals programs involve large public procurement, an area in which many developing countries have significant weaknesses. To help maintain organizational and financial integrity, managers should therefore commit to subjecting these programs to routine independent audits.

Effective targeting is also crucial, especially at a time when global prices are high and gains from leveraging existing resources may be limited. Poorly targeted interventions can leave the intended beneficiaries of a program even further behind. Additionally, attempts to expand school meals programs too quickly can end up straining financial and organizational capacity, undermining existing operations.

Encouraging governments to improve their school meals programs should go hand in hand with support from development partners to provide financial relief, especially in light of the debt crisis looming over a number of countries. Currently, the national budgets of many LMICs are burdened with debt service payments, which in some cases consume almost half of total government revenue. In these circumstances, programs such as school meals are often the first to be eliminated or reduced. For example, growing debt recently forced Ghana to suspend a planned expansion of its school meals program.

One way the international community can help countries struggling with the twin crises of food inflation and over-indebtedness is to promote debt-for-development swaps, such as the one the World Food Program brokered between the Mozambique and Russia in 2017. Although the process of negotiating these exchanges is too slow to meet emergency needs, they can be a powerful tool to facilitate the long-term allocation of more resources to meal programs schools in highly indebted countries.

As geopolitical crises and climate disasters dominate the headlines, a whole generation of poor and vulnerable children in places far from the spotlight are at risk of slipping through the cracks. Keeping these children in school and well fed is the least the global community can do to prepare them for an uncertain future.

Biniam Bedasso is a senior research associate at the Center for Global Development. — Project syndicate

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Congress puts an end to the crisis it itself created; passes bill strengthening the U.S. Postal Service https://guwiv.com/congress-puts-an-end-to-the-crisis-it-itself-created-passes-bill-strengthening-the-u-s-postal-service/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 18:48:09 +0000 https://guwiv.com/congress-puts-an-end-to-the-crisis-it-itself-created-passes-bill-strengthening-the-u-s-postal-service/ By Lauren McCauley The US Postal Service received a jolt of support on Tuesday when the Senate ended binding requirements rooted in a 2005 bill introduced by Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, who have long hobbled the federal agency. In a rare bipartisan action, the Senate voted 79 to 19 to pass the Postal Service Reform […]]]>

By Lauren McCauley

The US Postal Service received a jolt of support on Tuesday when the Senate ended binding requirements rooted in a 2005 bill introduced by Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, who have long hobbled the federal agency.

In a rare bipartisan action, the Senate voted 79 to 19 to pass the Postal Service Reform Act, which abandons a previous mandate that required the USPS to cover its healthcare costs years in advance. The bill also requires retired employees to enroll in Medicare when eligible.

The House Oversight Committee estimates that these two provisions will save the beleaguered agency nearly $50 billion over the next decade.

The bill authorized the U.S. House last month by a vote of 342 to 92 and is now heading to President Joe Biden to sign the law. U.S. Senators from Pennsylvania, Democrat Bob Casey and Republican Pat Toomey, have split over the bill. Casey voted for, while Toomey voted against the legislation, according to an official Senate roll call.

Lawmakers hope the reforms will help restore the agency, which has long been targeted by conservatives for privatization.

“This 15-year-old bill will finally help the Postal Service overcome the onerous demands that threaten its ability to provide reliable service to the American people,” said Democratic Senator Gary Peters, chairman of the Senate House Committee. homeland security, noted in a statement after the vote.

Collins’ Postal Accountability and Improvement Act (PAEA), which became law in 2006, required the Post to pay retirement health care benefits for workers 75 years into the future.

Economists and postmen said the action caused an economic crisis on the USPS by imposing a heavier pre-funding mandate than any other federal agency or private company, and paved the way for major cuts under the Trump administration.

John Curtis, a retired letter carrier from Surry who serves as director of education for the Maine State Association of Letter Carriers, said tag in August 2020, Collins’ bill “helped set the stage for the current attacks on the Postal Service”.

By 2020, the Postal Service had accumulated a debt of $160.9 billion. This side, $119.3 billion was the result of the pre-funding of retiree benefits.

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, appointed by former President Donald Trump, said the agency’s ” dire financial situation” major cuts needed leading to limited post office opening hours and longer delivery times.

The added burden of the COVID-19 pandemic has meant many venues have been woefully understaffed. In Maine, this caused significant slowdowns.

USPS Recount WGME in January that, not counting COVID-19-related absences, the agency had more than 90 open positions in Maine that it was actively trying to fill. The Bangor Daily News reported last month, these shortages meant that up to 20 to 30 postal routes were without mail every day.

Postal workers also noted that under DeJoy, the federal agency prioritized Amazon package delivery over first-class mail. This allegation was reported in Maine too. Collins and U.S. Representative Chellie Pingree have called for investigations into USPS practices.

Lauren McCauley is editor of the Maine Beacon, a sister site to the Pennsylvania Capital-Star, where this story first appeared.

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Russian-Ukrainian crisis: women bear the brunt of war https://guwiv.com/russian-ukrainian-crisis-women-bear-the-brunt-of-war/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 03:24:56 +0000 https://guwiv.com/russian-ukrainian-crisis-women-bear-the-brunt-of-war/ In times of war, the resulting humanitarian crisis often worsens and creates new inequalities within the dominant patriarchal structures. As a result, women bear the disproportionate burden of conflict with various forms of brutal dehumanization, including rape, violence, torture, exploitation, commonly used against them. With the intensification of the Russian offensive, what is happening in […]]]>

In times of war, the resulting humanitarian crisis often worsens and creates new inequalities within the dominant patriarchal structures. As a result, women bear the disproportionate burden of conflict with various forms of brutal dehumanization, including rape, violence, torture, exploitation, commonly used against them. With the intensification of the Russian offensive, what is happening in Ukraine is no different, where the ongoing war has taken a devastating toll on women.

Although excluded from the Minsk processes, Ukrainian women have been engaged since the Maidan revolution in 2013 in all areas of civil society and the armed forces, making modest gains in various sectors. But those gains have been under constant threat due to deep-rooted gender inequalities, eight years of conflict in eastern Ukraine and the socio-economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. Russia’s recent large-scale invasion of Ukraine will only add to this complex situation and put further pressure on the gains that Ukrainian women have made in the past.

Ukrainian women, who feel increasingly in danger in public and at home, are therefore waging a war on several fronts. For starters, in March 2021, the UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) and the Ukrainian Ministry of Social Policy confirmed that there were almost 1.5 million internally displaced people. Ukraine, of which 58.56% were female and 41.44% male. However, it is not a hidden fact that military invasions – such as the recent Russian aggression – can provoke and amplify the migration crisis, with women and children among the first to be displaced, posing a risk of double or triple displacement of those who have been displaced. already moved.

Analytical estimates have predicted that the fallout from Russia’s large-scale incursion into Ukraine could drive nearly five million people from their homes, most of whom will be women. Reports from the ground suggest that in the five days following the Russian invasion, at least 660,000 people, the majority of whom are women, have already fled Ukraine. Things have been made even more difficult for these women due to the order of the Ukrainian government which banned men between the ages of 18 and 60 from leaving the country, forcing them to stay back and fight the Russian offensive. Displaced Ukrainian women are therefore left on their own to seek safety for themselves and their children.

Additionally, gender-based violence (GBV) affects at least one-fifth of women in Ukraine, with almost 22% of Ukrainian women aged 15-49 having experienced at least one form of physical or sexual violence in their lifetime. life. This situation was aggravated by the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, during which calls to domestic violence helplines increased by 50% in the conflict-affected Donetsk and Luhansk regions. and 35% in other parts of Ukraine. But despite this increase, Amnesty International revealed in 2020 that there remained multiple loopholes in the system aimed at protecting victims, especially women, of domestic or sexual violence.

However, the devastating social and economic crisis, access to arms and trauma as a result of the current conflict will have a direct impact on violence against women, where an increasing number of Ukrainian women will have to endure sexual violence used as a “weapon of war” in the hands of the state and opposing forces. They could face additional hardship in the event of relentless escalation because the social infrastructure, such as services for victims of domestic violence, is not yet strong enough to adapt to the changes. Therefore, Ukrainian women and girls, especially those traveling alone, are at high risk of rape, sexual slavery, forced prostitution, forced pregnancy, forced sterilization and other forms of sexual violence.

But despite these deadly hardships and war-induced challenges, Ukrainian women are far from the only victims. Since the start of the Russian intrusion into eastern Ukraine in 2014, women have been at the forefront and have assumed every possible role in the army and volunteer battalions, often serving as paramedics, machine gunners , grenadiers, snipers, etc. Data indicates that as of March 2020, 29,760 women served in the Armed Forces of Ukraine with 902 senior officers.

As of March 2021, women made up 11% of all members of the Ukrainian Armed Forces and constituted 10% of those involved in military operations in the Donbass region. But with the recent full military mobilization, the presence of women in the Ukrainian military has further increased, including in combat roles. Currently, 36,000 women are diligently performing their duties and fighting shoulder to shoulder with their male counterparts in the Ukraine-Russia war.

Perhaps women in Ukraine are not only fighting on the personal front, dealing with the socio-economic consequences of the conflict, but also on the front line to defend the pride of their nation. Yet they are the ones who pay the high price of war. The international community as a whole must therefore not neglect the plight of these women and must continue to work closely with civil society organizations on the ground to mitigate the immediate gendered effects of the ongoing conflict. They must listen to women activists, displaced people, doctors, nurses and those fighting on the front lines.

(Akanksha Khullar is National Coordinator, Indian Women’s Regional Network)

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed above are those of the author. They do not necessarily reflect the views of DH.

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Creative Realities|Reflect Announces Winter ’22 Release with New Product Availability and Key CMS Software Enhancements https://guwiv.com/creative-realitiesreflect-announces-winter-22-release-with-new-product-availability-and-key-cms-software-enhancements/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/creative-realitiesreflect-announces-winter-22-release-with-new-product-availability-and-key-cms-software-enhancements/ Below are some of the improvements included in the Winter ’22 update. Non-contact production versionReflect Zero Touch – an innovative new approach to interactive experiences – was first introduced as a idea last summer, and the company is pleased to announce that it is now available for production deployment. Zero Touch can turn any screen […]]]>

Below are some of the improvements included in the Winter ’22 update.

Non-contact production version
Reflect Zero Touch – an innovative new approach to interactive experiences – was first introduced as a idea last summer, and the company is pleased to announce that it is now available for production deployment. Zero Touch can turn any screen into an interactive digital signage experience via a scannable QR code that controls the screen. Users can browse content, enter information, and even make purchases from their personal mobile device.

For organizations that want to deliver more engaging interactive experiences, but struggle with expensive touchscreen installations or screen cleaning issues, Zero Touch offers a cost-effective and secure way to engage and immerse users. Zero Touch also enables brands to extend the digital experience to the user’s mobile device even after leaving the proximity of the big screen, providing greater marketing reach and engagement opportunities.

Mobile user interface (UI) for Reflect Xperience
Launched in January 2021, Reflect Xperience is a reinvented way to access and use ReflectView, the premier platform for enterprise-class digital signage. Reflect Xperience enables brands to maintain centralized control of their digital signage content programs, while allowing individual users to easily and quickly schedule content specific to their location, easing the burden on content creation teams, improving local appeal of content programs and ensures consistency across locations. .

Reflect Xperience’s new mobile user interface makes scheduling faster, easier and even more intuitive by allowing any authorized user to update and schedule content directly from their mobile device.

Android media player support
ReflectView has long been the leading digital signage solution for Windows and BrightSign media players, and the company has now extended its reach to support Android media players. In addition to the vast majority of client applications using BrightSign and the range of specific applications for Windows media players, Android player support now allows customers to take advantage of system-on-chip solutions offered by major manufacturers. such as ELO and NEC. .

Customers can now deploy any combination of these three hardware platforms using ReflectView, benefiting from the industry’s most feature-rich, scalable and flexible digital signage platform.

“This opportunity highlights a beneficial expansion of our work with key partners like BrightSign,” said Lee Summers, former CEO of Reflect and now a member of the leadership team, as president of media and ad technology for the new company. “This new capability allows us to deploy BrightSign, or even Windows player solutions, in environments where customers have a legacy investment or also need to support Android players. Without Android support, Creative Realities and BrightSign may be blocked. these opportunities.”

Improved API support
The company continues to enhance its industry-leading network monitoring functionality with the addition of new device information APIs. These new API enhancements support calls to endpoints to periodically retrieve device state information, such as disconnected screens and various communication data from media players, including online state /offline, expired content and content read errors.

This approach dramatically reduces the amount of data needed to discern network status and identify endpoints that need attention. Additionally, these APIs allow IT managers to easily add performance insights from their digital signage network to existing monitoring tools, such as Power BI, further simplifying and optimizing network management.

“Reflect’s proven ability to consistently bring new and innovative features to enterprise digital signage customers is just one example of why merging our two companies made such sense” , said Rick Mills, CEO of Creative Realities. “The combination of Reflect’s world-class software capabilities and Creative Realities’ deployment and authoring services enables us to deliver exceptional value to our joint customers for many years to come.”

About Creative Realities, Inc.
Creative realities helps customers use the latest omnichannel technologies to inspire better customer experiences. The company designs, develops and deploys customer experiences for enterprise networks and actively provides SaaS and recurring support services in various vertical markets, including but not limited to automotive, ad networks, clothing and accessories, convenience stores, catering/QSR, game rooms, theater and stadium. The company operates through North America with active installations in more than 10 countries.

About Think
Now part of Creative Realities, Reflect provides powerful, cost-effective digital signage platforms and solutions, helping organizations create engaging experiences that engage staff and keep customers coming back for more. Reflect provides everything brands need, including strategy, creative services, robust ad traffic and content management systems, and media sales, all backed by the market leader. ReflectView and AdLogic software platforms.

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
This press release contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, and includes, among other things, discussions of our business strategies, product launches, future operations and capital resources. Words such as “estimates”, “projects”, “expects”, “anticipates”, “anticipates”, “plans”, “intends”, “believes”, “seeks”, “may” , “will”, “should”, “future”, “propose” and variations of these similar words or expressions (or negative versions of these words or expressions) are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements do not constitute not guarantees of future performance, conditions or results. They are based on the opinions, estimates and beliefs of management as of the date such statements are made, and are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties, assumptions and other factors, many of which are beyond our control, that may cause actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. of these risks are discussed in the section “Factor rs” contained in Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021 and the Company’s subsequent filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. Important factors, among others, that may affect actual results or results include: our ability to effectively integrate Reflect’s business operations, our customer retention strategy, growth, product development, market position , financial results and reserves, our ability to execute our business plan, our ability to retain key personnel, potential litigation, supply chain shortages and general economic and market conditions affecting on demand for our products and services, including those resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

SOURCE Creative Realities, Inc.

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How the Ukraine crisis is undermining Turkey’s economic program https://guwiv.com/how-the-ukraine-crisis-is-undermining-turkeys-economic-program/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 22:02:09 +0000 https://guwiv.com/how-the-ukraine-crisis-is-undermining-turkeys-economic-program/ The viability of the Turkish government’s “new economic model” – a controversial policy of fighting inflation without the central bank raising rates – was already in doubt before Russia’s incursion into Ukraine. But it is clearly at an impasse now as the fallout from the war jeopardizes Ankara’s plans to close its current account deficit […]]]>

The viability of the Turkish government’s “new economic model” – a controversial policy of fighting inflation without the central bank raising rates – was already in doubt before Russia’s incursion into Ukraine. But it is clearly at an impasse now as the fallout from the war jeopardizes Ankara’s plans to close its current account deficit by fostering export-led growth and stabilizing its battered currency by preserving lira deposits.

With annual consumer inflation already above 54%, Turkey stands to suffer some of the hardest blows of the conflict, as Russia and Ukraine are among its main economic partners, with crucial links in tourism, agricultural trade, energy and even the defense industry.

The impact is already tangible on several fronts. Chief among them is Turkey’s tourism industry, a vital source of hard-currency revenue, which had hoped to rebound this year to pre-pandemic levels. Bookings from Russia and Ukraine have stopped, and those from European countries have fallen sharply.

The Russians were the most important group foreign visitors to Turkey in 2021, some 4.7 million, or 19% of all tourists. Ukrainians rank third after Germans, numbering around 2 million or 8%. Turkey hoped $35 billion in tourism revenue this year, an increase of $24.5 billion in 2021 and equal with its income in 2019 before the COVID-19 pandemic hit.

Some tourism industry representatives are clinging to hopes that the Ukraine crisis could be resolved soon and that some of the canceled advance bookings could be renewed before the start of the high season. Although Turkey is not part of the avalanche of Western sanctions targeting Russia, disruptions to international air traffic and payment systems are weighing heavily on tour operators.

A tourism investment consultant in Antalya, Turkey’s main tourist hub on the Mediterranean coast, speaking on condition of anonymity, said sector planning for this year, based on the $35 billion target income, “had turned upside down” with the war. “The number of Ukrainian tourists reached nearly 2 million in Antalya alone. Antalya and the Aegean region will be hit hard,” he told Al-Monitor. “Nevertheless, we must not panic, and [we should] keep calm until May.

A tourism association executive speaking on condition of anonymity said: “The tourism sector is waiting with trepidation. He expected to surpass his 2019 performance and set a new record in 2022. Provided the Russian-Ukrainian crisis is resolved quickly, we have a chance to overcome it without major damage.

The money transfer problem could be solved by redirecting payments to Russian banks that are not subject to the SWIFT ban, experts say. And energy payments should go smoothly, given Exclusion of Gazprombank Sanctions.

Haluk Burumcekci, a prominent economist, warned of “significant losses” if the war drags on. “Russians and Ukrainians make up about 30% of tourists by number, but their share in tourism receipts is 15%. There might be risks, but the current account balance is the real issue here,” he told Al-Monitor.

Indeed, Ankara ambitious goal A current account surplus, which officials have described as the key to price stability, looks increasingly out of reach amid rising global energy prices fueled by the Ukraine crisis. The Turkish economy is heavily dependent on imported energy and inputs, the cost of which had already skyrocketed due to the sharp depreciation of the lira last year.

The country’s foreign trade deficit – the largest branch of the balance of payments – rose 186.3% year-on-year to some $18.4 billion in the first two months of the year, mainly due to soaring energy costs.

Russia is Turkey’s main energy supplier, supplying more than 33% of the country’s natural gas needs. In February, imports from Russia exceeded Turkey’s import bills by country.

Energy imports cost $8 billion in February out of total imports of $28.1 billion, and the foreign trade deficit stood at $8.1 billion, a 142% increase from at the same time last year.

Oil prices jumped more than 20% to over $115 a barrel last week, a level not seen in many years. And every $10 rise in oil prices adds $5 billion to Turkey’s current account deficit, economists calculate.

“Our monthly energy import bill jumped sharply to some $8 billion and is expected to climb to $10 billion in March,” Burumcekci said, recalling that monthly bills stood at $2-3 billion. last year. “This is a harbinger of the magnitude of the current account deficit. Current account deficit forecasts at year-end have already been raised to over $30 billion,” he added. .

JP Morgan recently doubled its forecast for Turkey’s current account deficit for 2022 to 2.2% of gross domestic product (GDP), while Goldman Sachs revised its forecasts at 2.5% against 1.5% of GDP.

Disruptions to Russia’s overseas supply chains and payments as well as difficulties affecting Turkish exports pose other economic challenges for Turkey. The war blocked the transport of goods to Ukraine and disabled land routes to Russia via Ukraine. Searching for alternative routes, Turkish trucks reportedly queues formed up to 20 kilometers (12 miles) to the Georgian-Russian border last week as freight prices jumped by around 50%.

Istanbul’s textile and leather centers are also bearing the brunt of the war, which is heavily dependent on Russian and Ukrainian buyers. According to business representatives in Laleli district, the heart of the garment industry and suitcase trade, orders of more than $200 million were canceled within days. The Russian and Ukrainian markets account for 40% of Laleli’s $3 billion annual sales. A prolonged war threatens billions of dollars in losses for industrialists in the sector.

With Russia and Ukraine being the two main wheat exporters, the war has pushed world wheat prices to record highs, threatening to worsen food inflation globally.

A fear of a shortage of sunflower oil has already surprised Turkey. The country is the world’s largest importer of sunflower seeds, and Russia and Ukraine supply 70% of its sunflower oil imports. At least 15 ships carrying crude sunflower oil to Turkey are believed to be stuck in the Sea of ​​Azov, barred from exit by the Russians. In one letter to government authorities earlier this month, the head of Turkey’s Vegetable Oil Industrialists Association called for measures to secure the passage of ships, warning that existing stocks would best meet the country’s needs by mid -April and crude sunflower oil prices had jumped to over $2,000 per ton from $1,400 before the war.

Food prices were already skyrocketing in Turkey and have risen further since the invasion, as have fuel prices, auguring further price increases across the board. Even before the war, annual consumer inflation in Turkey soared to 54.4% and producer inflation reached 105%, with energy and food prices leading the rise. Every $10 rise in the price of oil pushes up consumer inflation in Turkey by 1.5 percentage points, economists calculate.

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Seychelles foresees worse economic crisis as Russian-Ukrainian conflict affects tourism markets https://guwiv.com/seychelles-foresees-worse-economic-crisis-as-russian-ukrainian-conflict-affects-tourism-markets/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 09:38:22 +0000 https://guwiv.com/seychelles-foresees-worse-economic-crisis-as-russian-ukrainian-conflict-affects-tourism-markets/ Seychelles is anticipating an economic crisis worse than that caused by the COVID-19 pandemic with the impact of the conflict between Russia and Ukraine on its tourism markets in Eastern Europe, a senior official said on Friday. Tourism Minister Sylvestre Radegonde said the dispute will affect tourist arrivals from Russia, currently Seychelles’ biggest tourist market. […]]]>

Seychelles is anticipating an economic crisis worse than that caused by the COVID-19 pandemic with the impact of the conflict between Russia and Ukraine on its tourism markets in Eastern Europe, a senior official said on Friday.

Tourism Minister Sylvestre Radegonde said the dispute will affect tourist arrivals from Russia, currently Seychelles’ biggest tourist market.

In 2021, the market attracted 32,000 tourists to Seychelles, an archipelago in the western Indian Ocean.

Seychelles has tapped into Eastern European markets after a drop in travel caused by COVID-19 which affected arrivals from traditional Western European markets, namely Germany, France and Italy.

“International flights operated by Aeroflot, Emirates and Turkish Airlines are still connecting Russia with Seychelles. Looking at the current numbers, we see that there have been some cancellations, but not at the level we thought they would be. With the As of day eight, the sanctions imposed by the US and EU countries are still fresh and as such have not yet fully kicked in. When they do, we will really see the consequences. impacts,” Radegonde said.

The tourism department noted that Aeroflot is still arriving at full occupancy and nearly 250 passengers landed in Seychelles on Friday. However, Russian visitors disembark in Seychelles only in cash, as payments via SWIFT, MasterCard and VisaCard are no longer possible for them due to the imposed sanctions.

“As the sanctions apply, you will see that Aeroflot will naturally stop working, but that does not mean that Russians will not come to Seychelles. Russians will find other ways to reach Seychelles” , said Radegonde.