united states – GUWIV http://guwiv.com/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 00:05:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://guwiv.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/guw-150x150.png united states – GUWIV http://guwiv.com/ 32 32 Protecting poor children from the impending food crisis – News https://guwiv.com/protecting-poor-children-from-the-impending-food-crisis-news/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 19:49:15 +0000 https://guwiv.com/protecting-poor-children-from-the-impending-food-crisis-news/ The crisis in the global wheat and maize market has caused food inflation in sub-Saharan Africa to rise by 11% PA By Biniam Bedasso Published: Wed 16 Mar 2022, 11:49 PM Russia’s attack on Ukraine threatens to further disrupt the global food system by dramatically increasing the cost of staple foods and the energy needed […]]]>

The crisis in the global wheat and maize market has caused food inflation in sub-Saharan Africa to rise by 11%



PA

By Biniam Bedasso

Published: Wed 16 Mar 2022, 11:49 PM

Russia’s attack on Ukraine threatens to further disrupt the global food system by dramatically increasing the cost of staple foods and the energy needed to transport them. The Black Sea region is responsible for exporting at least 12% of global food calories, so cutting off access will have far-reaching effects.

Food prices were already skyrocketing due to post-pandemic market imbalances and supply chain pressures, as well as climate-related production losses. By the end of last year, the crisis in the world market for wheat and maize had pushed up food inflation in sub-Saharan Africa by 11%. Now poor countries face another shock at a time when they have little room to accommodate it.

Even before the economic crisis caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, vulnerable households in developing countries devoted a significant part of their budget to food. Further increases in the cost of food could lead children in these households to suffer significant and irreversible nutritional losses. They might go to school hungry or even drop out to help supplement their family’s income. Given the massive learning losses suffered by children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) due to pandemic-related school closures, any further disruption could have devastating consequences.

Fortunately, most countries have a proven tool to protect their most vulnerable children in these circumstances. School meal programs are considered the largest social safety net in the world. Before the pandemic, these programs reached 388 million children in 161 countries.

READ ALSO :

There is ample evidence that the provision of school meals is an important tool to keep poor and vulnerable children in class in food insecure areas. This is true even during systemic shocks such as droughts which can affect the overall food supply. Many developing countries recognized the value of school meals as a tool for social protection when global food prices soared following the global financial crisis of 2008. Over the past decade, a growing number of PRITI have integrated school meals into their national budgets as a cost-effective way to improve the health and educational outcomes of schoolchildren.

In the context of rising food and fuel prices, buying food in bulk and preparing meals in a school can potentially generate economies of scale and efficiency that help reduce overall costs. . A recent study based on the National School Lunch Program in the United States shows that school nutrition programs help lower prices in grocery stores by reducing private food purchases.

Countries exposed to the negative effects of the current turmoil in food and energy markets should strive to strengthen these programs. But consistently providing nutritious school meals to a significant portion of the school population can nonetheless be prohibitively expensive for countries with limited resources. A rough calculation based on data from the Global Child Nutrition Foundation indicates that to expand coverage of school meals programs in LMICs at the current global median level would require the equivalent of 5% of the global education budget of a country.

One of the first steps countries can take to stabilize and eventually expand school meals programs is to improve the efficiency and ensure accountability of existing programs. Developing countries have seen many noble public sector initiatives that began with much promise, only to succumb to mismanagement and eroded public trust.

School meals programs involve large public procurement, an area in which many developing countries have significant weaknesses. To help maintain organizational and financial integrity, managers should therefore commit to subjecting these programs to routine independent audits.

Effective targeting is also crucial, especially at a time when global prices are high and gains from leveraging existing resources may be limited. Poorly targeted interventions can leave the intended beneficiaries of a program even further behind. Additionally, attempts to expand school meals programs too quickly can end up straining financial and organizational capacity, undermining existing operations.

Encouraging governments to improve their school meals programs should go hand in hand with support from development partners to provide financial relief, especially in light of the debt crisis looming over a number of countries. Currently, the national budgets of many LMICs are burdened with debt service payments, which in some cases consume almost half of total government revenue. In these circumstances, programs such as school meals are often the first to be eliminated or reduced. For example, growing debt recently forced Ghana to suspend a planned expansion of its school meals program.

One way the international community can help countries struggling with the twin crises of food inflation and over-indebtedness is to promote debt-for-development swaps, such as the one the World Food Program brokered between the Mozambique and Russia in 2017. Although the process of negotiating these exchanges is too slow to meet emergency needs, they can be a powerful tool to facilitate the long-term allocation of more resources to meal programs schools in highly indebted countries.

As geopolitical crises and climate disasters dominate the headlines, a whole generation of poor and vulnerable children in places far from the spotlight are at risk of slipping through the cracks. Keeping these children in school and well fed is the least the global community can do to prepare them for an uncertain future.

Biniam Bedasso is a senior research associate at the Center for Global Development. — Project syndicate

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Assistant Attorney General Matthew Olsen delivers remarks at a press conference announcing the transnational crackdown charges | Takeover bid https://guwiv.com/assistant-attorney-general-matthew-olsen-delivers-remarks-at-a-press-conference-announcing-the-transnational-crackdown-charges-takeover-bid/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 19:14:55 +0000 https://guwiv.com/assistant-attorney-general-matthew-olsen-delivers-remarks-at-a-press-conference-announcing-the-transnational-crackdown-charges-takeover-bid/ Good afternoon. We are here to report three significant cases, unsealed today in the Eastern District of New York. These cases reveal attempts by the government of the People’s Republic of China to suppress dissenting voices in the United States. They demonstrate how the PRC seeks to hunt down, intimidate and silence those who oppose […]]]>

Good afternoon. We are here to report three significant cases, unsealed today in the Eastern District of New York.

These cases reveal attempts by the government of the People’s Republic of China to suppress dissenting voices in the United States. They demonstrate how the PRC seeks to hunt down, intimidate and silence those who oppose it.

In discussing these cases, I would like to reiterate that the department remains focused on the actions of the PRC government and its agents – not the Chinese people or those of Chinese descent, who are often the victims of these crimes. Although separate issues, these three cases are all very much related.

One shows an insidious strategy of gathering information on dissidents in order to target them and, in some cases, imprison democracy advocates abroad. A case describes a plot to derail the candidacy for Congress of a US citizen and veteran, who was also a former student protester during the 1989 Tiananmen protest and later fled to the United States . And one shows a campaign of surveillance and harassment of an artist engaged in free and peaceful expression.

All three cases show that if you report such abuses, US law enforcement will respond and demonstrate that law enforcement was able to disrupt these plots and bring the perpetrators to justice.

Last month, when I announced the National Security Division’s new strategy for countering threats from nation states, I said that our approach would be driven by the greatest threats, including the alarming increase in transnational repression. This is an example of what I meant.

Authoritarian states around the world feel encouraged to go beyond their borders to intimidate or retaliate against individuals who dare to speak out against oppression and corruption.

For example, the Justice Department recently filed charges against people involved in the forced diversion of a commercial flight by Belarus to arrest and detain a Belarusian journalist and dissident. We prosecuted those who participated in Iranian plots targeting dissidents living here, including a plot to kidnap an Iranian-American activist in New York.

We have prosecuted agents from Russia and Egypt for illegally surveilling and targeting dissidents of these authoritarian regimes. And we have denounced attempts by the PRC and Saudi Arabia to deploy agents inside technology companies to obtain private information about critics and to obstruct the exercise of freedom of expression.

Today, we’re adding three more cases to that list.

For the Department of Justice, defending American institutions and values ​​against these threats is a national security imperative. Transnational repression is part of the range of tactics employed by our adversaries in an attempt to undermine our democracy, our economy and our institutions. And it’s a threat not only to people in the United States, but also to people around the world who seek to exercise their basic rights to free speech and oppose authoritarianism.

This activity is contrary to core American values ​​- we will not tolerate such repression here when it violates our laws. We will defend the rights of Americans and those who come to live, work and study in the United States. We will not allow any foreign government to deny them freedom of expression or the protection of our laws or to threaten their safety or that of their families.

Today’s cases, which U.S. Attorney Breon Peace will discuss in more detail in a moment, demonstrate that the Department of Justice will protect American democracy and ensure that everyone within our borders have access to equal justice under the rule of law and enjoy the protection of the United States. Constitution.

As I said, these alleged conspiracies are separate cases, and each will be prosecuted based on the facts and the law in federal court, and each of these defendants is presumed innocent unless or until he is proven guilty in court.

Authoritarian regimes seek to deprive people of their human rights and fundamental freedoms. These cases reflect America’s commitment to freedom and justice.

I will now turn the floor over to the United States Attorney who will present today’s charges.

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The Ukrainian crisis marks the beginning of a reaction against American excess https://guwiv.com/the-ukrainian-crisis-marks-the-beginning-of-a-reaction-against-american-excess/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 03:00:39 +0000 https://guwiv.com/the-ukrainian-crisis-marks-the-beginning-of-a-reaction-against-american-excess/ How long would the United States lecture the world and get away with it? Maybe not for very long, judging by the straws in the wind. Even America’s closest friends and allies are becoming resistant to American moralizing and unilateralism. “I just don’t care… We don’t have the right to lecture you in America… It’s […]]]>

How long would the United States lecture the world and get away with it? Maybe not for very long, judging by the straws in the wind. Even America’s closest friends and allies are becoming resistant to American moralizing and unilateralism.

“I just don’t care… We don’t have the right to lecture you in America… It’s the same the other way around,” replied Mohammed Bin Salman, the crown prince. of Saudi Arabia, when asked if Biden had misunderstood things about him. . Mohammed Bin Salman (MbS) and the UAE Crown Prince are in no rush to heed the US President’s call for them to pump more oil to avoid a sharp rise in oil prices, following US sanctions against Russia.

The United States has an amazing ability to move in and out of one conflict after another, entangling both partners and adversaries, who must then pick up the pieces. Whether in Iraq or Afghanistan – remember the American leaders who said they had no part in nation building? After handing over the unfortunate Afghan people to the Taliban and turning Nelson’s eyes to the ensuing humanitarian crisis, the Biden administration has now turned its guns on Russia. That Ukraine be destroyed and innocent civilians killed is inevitable collateral damage to the world’s oldest democracy.

Recently, President Biden hinted at the most dreaded eventuality. “…while we provide this support to Ukraine…we will defend every square inch of NATO territory…If they move once…okay, if we respond, it’s World War III, but we have a sacred obligation on NATO territory… (but)… We will not fight WWIII in Ukraine. Be careful what you wish for, you might get it!

Scripting a man-made tragedy

But how was this man-made tragedy in Ukraine scripted? President Biden had branded Putin a killer, accused him of interfering in US presidential elections and planning cyberattacks. Then came the carrot in the form of a three-hour meeting last June in Geneva between the American and Russian presidents, at the end of which the former remarked that there were “real prospects for improvement significance of relationships.

However, the United States continued to supply kyiv with lethal and non-lethal munitions, including Javelin anti-tank missiles. In 2021, security assistance worth $450 million was made available. The United States has also stepped up training for the Ukrainian military, deploying some 150 members of the Florida National Guard’s Task Force Gator, as well as an unknown number of men from Special Operations Command Europe.

As tensions over Ukraine rose in January, Biden threatened Russia with serious consequences if it invaded Ukraine, adding a caveat: “It depends on what (Russia) does. It’s one thing if it’s a minor incursion and we end up having to fight over what to do and what not to do…. It was left to White House aides to soothe frayed nerves in kyiv.

After Russia recognized the independence of Donetsk and Luhansk – separatist enclaves in eastern Ukraine – President Biden promised tough sanctions against Russia but made it clear that the United States will not would not engage Russia militarily and would only protect the territorial integrity of NATO members. This position has since been reiterated several times. It is intended to assure the American public that the United States does not allow itself to be drawn into another conflict and also to anticipate outside pressures at a later date. But could this unusual public stance have emboldened Moscow to launch a full-fledged invasion?

As if anticipating that Russia would swallow the bait, the United States quickly implemented the toughest economic sanctions in history, allegedly in coordination with Europe. Putin and Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov were personally targeted along with other political figures. Just when it was most needed, the scheduled meeting between Secretary Blinken and Lavrov was called off.

A one-sided story?

The West has since added fuel to the fire by supplying Ukraine with all sorts of weapons, including anti-tank and surface-to-air missiles. Efforts are underway to persuade Poland to transfer its Russian-made fighter jets to kyiv as well, except the former is playing hardball. Moreover, according to unconfirmed reports, ex-US marines (and Chechen fighters on the Russian side) are heading towards the conflict zone in large numbers. Doesn’t it take a lot of imagination to decipher who pays the mercenaries? This effectively means American boots on the ground, which is sure to provoke Russia further.

The information war is at its height with the West controlling the narrative and demonizing Russia. On March 5, Russia was accused of attacking the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in southern Ukraine with missiles. Hardly anyone bothered to look at the map or ask what Russia would gain from such a mishap, given the physical proximity of its own territory and population would have been subjected to nuclear radiation. It turned out that during the crossfire, one or two shells accidentally fell about half a kilometer from the reactor, which was never in danger.

Meanwhile, Ukraine continues to be pounded as invading Russian forces, keen to limit civilian casualties, slowly gain ground. President Zelensky’s dogged resistance turns into bluster as he persists in harassing Putin, calling Russian action genocide and terrorism and demanding Western military and material support. He insisted on the establishment of a no-fly zone over Ukraine, which is a ruse to draw NATO into a direct confrontation with Russia. He refuses to see the writing on the wall and seems to preside over the decimation of his country. Only time will tell if he would be hailed as “David” or likened to Nero who kept playing the violin while Rome burned.

And then there is the European Union (EU), which has generally deferred to the United States rather than defending its interests, in part because of its security dependence on Washington. The EU and Russia are neighbours; the United States is one ocean away. The EU and Russia have interdependencies; the United States, especially its large corporations, are more concerned with safeguarding their economic interests in China. France, a major player in the EU and NATO, is unlikely to forget or forgive being caught off guard by Biden on the AUKUS deal. NATO also cannot understand why Biden decided to fast-track the US exit from Afghanistan without even token consultations.

From the start of the conflict, President Biden managed to convince the newly elected German Chancellor to put the Nord Stream 2 project in cold storage. However, the enormity of the challenge and the economic cost of disrupting Russian oil and gas supplies quickly took their toll on European majors, forcing them to be selective in replicating US sanctions.

READ ALSO | Russo-Ukrainian war: Europe’s costly energy transition has accelerated the race for great powers

Long-term impact of the Ukrainian crisis

Whether it is the EU, the Arab world, the ASEAN region, Taiwan, Japan or India, there is more than an underground anxiety about overreliance on of the United States as a world leader, which prompts a recalibration of geostrategic assumptions. Allow me to reflect on the India-US relationship that has grown from near alienation to global engagement over the previous two decades. Yet there is a sense of continued hesitation due to Washington’s reluctance to give due weight to New Delhi’s geo-strategic, security and socio-economic imperatives.

Whether it is terrorism emanating from Pakistan, importing oil from Iran, our longstanding defense cooperation with Russia, interests in Afghanistan or Myanmar, democratic institutions in India or of societal dynamics, the United States tends to be prescriptive or judgmental. After every presidential election, South Block holds its breath until the new White House incumbent reaffirms the status quo with India.

Coming back to the Russian invasion, it’s no surprise that the American media, which struggles to find anything positive about India even in normal times, has been very critical of our position, as do many members of Congress and members of the policy community. Official circles have shown some appreciation for India’s plight due to its critical dependence on Russian military hardware.

Privately, there has been measured pressure on India, including perhaps at the hastily convened Virtual Quad Summit on March 3. The possibility of the Biden administration imposing CAATSA sanctions on India cannot be ruled out, which would reduce ties and possibly temper India’s interest in Quadruple.

The Ukrainian crisis will have repercussions across the spectrum. Ukraine will regret its decision to separate from nuclear weapons in 1994 and will trust the solemn commitments of the great powers, but for which it would never have known the current fate. North Korea will feel vindicated. Talks with Iran will become more difficult. The global arms race, including the quest for weapons of mass destruction, would intensify. The Western military-industrial complex is going to blow up the bubbly; China may decide to test the resolve of the distracted United States, by undertaking a misadventure. Global economies will take a hit due to the rising cost of imports and supply-side disruptions.

The Swedish chancellor, Count Axel Oxenstierna, in a letter to his son in 1648 wrote: ‘You don’t know my son, how unwisely the world is ruled‘. The current generation of world leaders is determined to prove the Chancellor right!

The author is a former envoy to South Korea and Canada and an official spokesperson for the Department of External Affairs. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not represent the position of this publication.

Read all the latest Ukraine-Russia war news, breaking news and live updates here.

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Ukraine Crisis: The Global Economic Fallout https://guwiv.com/ukraine-crisis-the-global-economic-fallout/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 18:40:53 +0000 https://guwiv.com/ukraine-crisis-the-global-economic-fallout/ posted on March 14, 2022 | Author Dr. RAJAN KATOCH Call it a crisis, a conflict, a war, whatever. This is happening right now in Ukraine and all over the world. Ukraine and Russia face off in a conventional military battle on the ground in Ukraine. The United States (US) and the European Union (EU) […]]]>

posted on March 14, 2022 | Author Dr. RAJAN KATOCH

Call it a crisis, a conflict, a war, whatever. This is happening right now in Ukraine and all over the world. Ukraine and Russia face off in a conventional military battle on the ground in Ukraine. The United States (US) and the European Union (EU) are extending their external support to Ukraine in terms of armaments and funding. They have also embarked on a merciless economic war against Russia. It is indeed a kind of world war.

There are merits and demerits of positions. Death and destruction are commonplace. There’s no way of knowing how this will end. Without going into the details above, what is certain is that this global conflict will have dire economic consequences, regardless of the outcome of the fighting.

The US-led coalition imposed severe and unprecedented financial sanctions on Russia. He actually launched a society-wide economic war against Russia. Russian foreign exchange reserves (denominated in US dollars) were frozen. Russian banks have been prevented from making interbank settlements via SWIFT, the global standard for this purpose. For the first time, private sector companies based in US/EU jurisdictions have been used as an economic weapon. Multinational tech giants like Apple and Tesla, credit card majors like Visa and MasterCard, consumer giants like McDonalds and Coca-Cola have all ceased operations in Russia.

Which direction will this go? The costs of war are always immense and will take a long time to overcome. Both fighters, Ukraine and Russia, are going to be very upset. Their GDP could contract by up to a third, according to some estimates. Ukraine is clearly suffering direct damage. For Russia, too, the financial sanctions will cause considerable disruption. Trading or doing business with Russia under these sanctions will become very difficult. The Russian economy and the economies of countries that have significant trade with Russia will be affected.

But these sweeping sanctions will also strike at the heart of the international capitalist order based on open trade and global affairs. Now, mere ownership (eg foreign exchange reserves) of assets does not mean control, it seems. Hitherto sacrosanct, international and intergovernmental commercial contracts can be easily repudiated! The private sector must also toe the line, at its own expense.

The ease with which age-old rules of the game can be changed overnight by American diktat will worry others outside the Western framework. This will shake their confidence in the existing international financial system. Today, Russia is the target. Tomorrow someone else may be at the reception.

These developments may in fact prompt other major countries to seek independent alternatives to the Western financial system (such as a SWIFT substitute or digital currency settlements). This is something that has not been seriously considered so far.

Globalization will reverse itself, and so will its projected benefits. For example, there is now a strong possibility of an increasing segmentation of global commerce, communications and even the Internet after the crisis is over.

In the short term, trade embargoes will impact commodity markets. The biggest impact would be on the oil market. Russia is a major supplier of oil and gas to Europe. So far, Russian oil and gas supplies to Europe have not been sanctioned. Sooner or later, these supplies are likely to be affected, exacerbating shortages. Oil is already trading at over $130 a barrel. Oil importers, including India and China, will face a difficult period.

The market for food raw materials will also be in turmoil. Russia and Ukraine together account for about a third of world wheat and maize exports. In edible oils, 80% of world sunflower exports come from these two countries. Supply shortages here will affect prices and affect importing regions, all the way to Africa.

Russia is a major fertilizer exporter. Fertilizer production in Europe depends on gas. There will be problems for countries that depend on imported fertilizers like Brazil and India.

The microchip shortage that is already plaguing the global industry in 2021 will continue. Russia is a major supplier of base metals like palladium, neon and platinum which are essential for the production of microchips. The automobile industry will be one of the main victims, in all countries.

Although part of the economic offensive against Russia, Europe will also face the backlash effect of sanctions. Europe is heavily dependent on Russian gas. Power shortages are likely and what is available will cost more. Germany has (for now) halted the commissioning of the $11 billion Nord Strom II gas pipeline from Russia. If launched, this pipeline would have made gas cheaper and more abundant in Europe. Shortages of oil, gas, food and fertilizer will cause prices to rise and inflation to rise.

For EU countries, there is a dramatic increase in threat perception from Russia. This means that European countries will spend much more on armaments. For example, even the normally hesitant Germany declared that it would spend another $100 billion on armaments. Needless to say, this would come at the expense of development and welfare spending. Other EU countries will have to follow suit.

As a result, the United States could win in the short term. In Europe, it created enormous additional demand for the production of its armaments industry, as well as for the export of gas. In one fell swoop, he managed to scuttle the growing trade relationship between Europe and Russia and strengthen his own economic ties with European markets.

The longer-term economic fallout for the United States is less certain. The militarization of private sector entities can threaten their multinational credibility. The current definition of Russia as “the enemy” also means a dilution of attention on China. For the United States, the main economic, technological and military challenge in the future will always come from China. By brilliantly reigniting Cold War hostilities, the United States may have taken its eyes off the ball. This could cost him dearly in the years to come, in ways that are still unpredictable.

Where does that leave India? Politically, India has kept the balance between the two sides. Whatever its political position, the Indian economy will be affected. Japanese research group Nomura predicts that India will be the hardest hit among major economies in Asia.

The main reason is that India imports 80% of its oil needs. Union budget estimates were based on an oil price of $70 to $75 a barrel. The prices are already much higher. This gap will widen both the budget deficit and the trade deficit. The rupee will depreciate. Fertilizers and edible oils will also become more expensive.

There is no easy way out. Prices will go up. Inflation is already at the upper end of the mandatory 4-6% band. Sooner or later, the RBI will have to raise interest rates to dampen inflationary expectations. GDP growth is expected to be more modest than expected. There’s no immediate silver lining in the cloud.

As an old saying goes, it’s a bad wind that doesn’t blow well!

(The author is a former civil servant who also served at the World Bank. He writes by invitation for RK)

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Ukraine and Pakistan crisis – Journal https://guwiv.com/ukraine-and-pakistan-crisis-journal/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 02:11:11 +0000 https://guwiv.com/ukraine-and-pakistan-crisis-journal/ The Russian invasion of Ukraine is an inflection point in world affairs, similar to the American opening to China in the early 1970s and the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. The situation unfolds . There are many imponderables, including its impact on Russia itself. Its consistency is evident but the direction is unclear. […]]]>

The Russian invasion of Ukraine is an inflection point in world affairs, similar to the American opening to China in the early 1970s and the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. The situation unfolds . There are many imponderables, including its impact on Russia itself. Its consistency is evident but the direction is unclear. Pakistan should be concerned about what development portends for the future.

Russia has ostensibly acted to secure its periphery. It did so as a great power that puts its perceived interests first rather than showing sensitivity to the principles of state relations enshrined in the UN Charter. The invasion of Ukraine was preceded by deep differences between Moscow and the West led by Washington with the barely concealed ambition to bring into the fold of its political and security system not only the former countries of the Pact of Warsaw, but also Ukraine and Georgia which had once been Soviet. territories. President Putin has repeatedly insisted that Ukraine not be part of NATO.

The quasi-ideological foundation of this ambition was the belief in the emergence of a unipolar world led by the United States which admitted no sphere of influence, security or economic, of a rival power. For nearly three decades, the United States has enjoyed unprecedented economic and military preponderance in the world. This propelled NATO expansion to Russia’s doorstep, taking advantage of the desire of Eastern Europeans themselves albeit in violation of the reported verbal assurance given to Moscow at the time of reunification. Germany. The United States challenged Russia in the Middle East and organized the Quad by enlisting Japan and India as partners in a larger Indo-Pacific strategy. China’s economic rise and signs of a resurgent Russia are seen as a threat. Nevertheless, unipolarism was inherently destabilizing in a world moving towards multipolarity. On the other hand, the Russian invasion shows a total disregard for the principles of the United Nations Charter and international law. Russia has faced no imminent threat to justify its action which deals a crushing blow to principles-based aspirations for world peace, diplomacy and state-to-state discourse. President Putin should have exercised a number of other less blatant options apart from armed aggression against Ukraine.

How has Pakistan got through this first phase of the crisis and what challenges await us?

The United States and Europe responded with the toughest economic sanctions, including the scuttling of the mega Nord Stream gas pipeline from Russia to Germany, and measures to strengthen the security of NATO’s eastern flank and support for Ukraine. Even if the security dimension remains confined to Central Europe and Ukraine, the global economic map will change with new walls blocking the free flow of dollar-based finance and trade. This portends a new world order in which, so far, the United States seems to have a strong position. Europe has moved closer to the United States than ever before.

Beyond the European theater which will now demand greater US attention, the US capacity for proactive security initiatives elsewhere, notably in Asia-Pacific, will diminish. This will increase the comfort space for China.

There are some diplomatic initiatives to stop the conflict although their prospects remain clouded or unclear. Israel attempts mediation. Turkey offered a venue for talks between the Russian and Ukrainian foreign ministers who reportedly discussed the resulting humanitarian crisis. In essence, Russia demands nothing less than full surrender, while the Ukrainians who are putting up remarkable resistance demand a ceasefire and Russian withdrawal. There is a faint hope that Moscow can be content with Ukrainian neutrality and firm assurances that NATO will not expand further. Perhaps China, given the congruence of its interests with Russia, particularly in Central Asia, as well as some EU countries can play a role. For any solution, however, Moscow will have to give up its desire to absorb all or part of Ukraine and replace the elected Ukrainian government and Washington will have to suppress its impulse to retain unipolar primacy.

How has Pakistan got through this first phase of the crisis and what challenges await us? Are there any opportunities?

Pakistan’s decision to maintain the Prime Minister’s visit was a good one, considering that for years Pakistan had been trying to inject confidence and ease into our relationship with Moscow. Likewise, our decision to abstain was a logical choice following the Chinese and Indian votes in the Security Council. Pakistan was quite pragmatic in its decisions when a situation involved major powers. In January 1980, as the lead nation in negotiating a resolution in the Security Council on the Soviet military intervention in Afghanistan, we successfully resisted the designation of the Soviet Union and called for the withdrawal of “foreign troops “. Our official criticism of the US invasion of Iraq in 2003 or US interventions in Syria and Libya was circumspect.

Principles are important, but nations weigh their fundamental interests when making decisions in tense and critical situations. The approach of the ambassadors to the EU was understandable, but they went too far by making their communication with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs public. There was no similar action in New Delhi. How could they entertain greater expectations of Islamabad given their opposition to Pakistan’s interests in the FATF or the Nuclear Suppliers Group or their virtual indifference to the plight of Kashmiris and Indian Muslims discriminated against by the Hindutva? Regardless of this indiscretion, which deserved only a response from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, we must maintain a clear emphasis in our statements in favor of Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity and the prevention of violence against civilians, while calling for diplomacy and a peaceful resolution. But dragging this policy onto public platforms for national political advantage is discouraged.

Are there opportunities for Pakistan? Arguably, Pakistan’s geopolitical relevance to Russia and China will be enhanced, especially for possible trade and communication corridors. Afghanistan remains an obstacle. Moreover, unlike countries endowed with oil by Providence, we will need capabilities to take advantage of our location to build our national strength. Simple aspiration is not enough. So far, our domestic policy has shown an inexcusable apathy towards this imperative, as evidenced by the sad state of our economy and our education. Finally, Pakistan is safe today because nuclear deterrence is an integral part of its security: a lesson reinforced by the Ukrainian crisis.

The writer is a former foreign minister and an author.

Posted in Dawn, March 13, 2022

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Premeditated Current Economic Crisis: Mayura Gunawansa PC https://guwiv.com/premeditated-current-economic-crisis-mayura-gunawansa-pc/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 03:15:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/premeditated-current-economic-crisis-mayura-gunawansa-pc/ COLOMBO (News 1st); Mayura Gunawansa PC, a participant in the “Mawatha” program, alleged that the current economic situation was not caused by negligence and was part of a plan. Speaking on the show, he said this economic situation was not due to mere coincidence, and that geopolitical interests and corrupt politicians played a part in […]]]>

COLOMBO (News 1st); Mayura Gunawansa PC, a participant in the “Mawatha” program, alleged that the current economic situation was not caused by negligence and was part of a plan.

Speaking on the show, he said this economic situation was not due to mere coincidence, and that geopolitical interests and corrupt politicians played a part in it.

Emphasizing that many members of the Government are people who have dealt with it for a long time, such as PB Jayasundara who managed the Sri Lankan economy for more than 05 decades, Minister Bandula Gunawardena having an experience of more than 20 years in the domain, and the current governor of CBSL, Ajith Nivard Cabral, having an experience of more than 20 years in the domains, PC Gunawansa asked how these people could not have knowledge of the management of the economic situation of the country.

He further said that these same people made arrangements to allow district government officers to give away Sri Lankan land for investment, removed farmers from fertile land, allowed crises to occur and evolve, and have even created crises in sectors such as gas, milk powder, fuel and many other vital sectors of the country.

In the meantime, the President’s Council pointed out that it is possible to observe a new trend of the formation of new developments in the country, such as the recent opening of cement and tire factories, in addition to the development of a steel mill. .

Likewise, companies such as New Fortress through the Yugadanavi LNG deal have started to get involved in fuel and gas trading, thus the government has created an atmosphere that allows countries like the United States and India to play their geopolitical games and in the meantime they are starting a business. monopoly within the country.

However, he said, people have no knowledge of the real power behind all these investments and developments. Just as people don’t know the major shareholders of the company behind the New Fortress deal, people don’t know the investors in the proposed steel company.

“Once this commercial monopoly is created in the country, the power will be in their hands… The finance minister is the main actor and also the creator of this crisis,” he added.

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EARLY WARNING PRESS RELEASE – CROWN CAPITAL PARTNERS INC. https://guwiv.com/early-warning-press-release-crown-capital-partners-inc/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 23:22:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/early-warning-press-release-crown-capital-partners-inc/ /NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION TO U.S. NEWS SERVICES OR DISTRIBUTION IN UNITED STATES/ TORONTO, March 10, 2022 /CNW/ – Crown Capital Partners Inc. (the “Transmitter“) (TSX:CRWN): This press release is issued by EdgePoint Investment Group Inc. (“EdgePoint“) and EdgePoint Canadian Portfolio (“EPCP“), and collectively with EdgePoint, (the “Acquirer“) as required by National Instrument 62-103 – The […]]]>

/NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION TO U.S. NEWS SERVICES OR DISTRIBUTION IN UNITED STATES/

TORONTO, March 10, 2022 /CNW/ – Crown Capital Partners Inc. (the “Transmitter“) (TSX:CRWN): This press release is issued by EdgePoint Investment Group Inc. (“EdgePoint“) and EdgePoint Canadian Portfolio (“EPCP“), and collectively with EdgePoint, (the “Acquirer“) as required by National Instrument 62-103 – The Early Warning System and Issues Related to Takeover Bids and Insider Reporting (“National Instrument 62-103“), with respect to the common shares (“Shares“) in the capital of the Issuer.

Following the closing of the Issuer’s substantial public tender offer, the results of which have been announced March 8, 2022 (the “To offer“), EdgePoint tendered 284,167 Issuer Shares at a price of $7.50 per share, resulting in total proceeds of $2,131,253.

Prior to the closing of the offering, EdgePoint exercised control or direction over 1,412,873 shares while EPCP beneficially owned 781,271 shares. Immediately following the closing of the offering, EdgePoint exercises control or direction over a total of 1,128,706 shares representing 19.59% of the shares now issued and outstanding, while EPCP is the beneficial and registered owner of 624,136 shares representing 10.83% of the shares now issued and outstanding. EdgePoint has control or direction but not ownership of the Shares and provides discretionary portfolio management services to various accounts, including EPCP. EPCP has not acquired ownership of any of the shares that triggered the obligation to issue and file this press release. EPCP is not an eligible institutional investor and therefore would not be permitted to file reports under the alternative monthly reporting system under Part 4 of NI 62-103 for the issuer.

The acquisition of Issuer Shares by EdgePoint, including Shares beneficially owned by EPCP, was made in the ordinary course of business and for investment purposes. EdgePoint may in the future acquire or dispose of additional Shares of the Issuer or may enter into derivative or other transactions relating to such Shares on behalf of the accounts it manages.

An alert statement will be filed by the acquirer under applicable securities laws and will be available on the issuer’s SEDAR profile at www.sedar.com. A copy of the Early Warning Report can also be obtained by contacting Sayuri Childs, EdgePoint’s Chief Compliance Officer at (416) 963-9353. EdgePoint’s corporate office is located at 150 Bloor St. West, Suite 500, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2X9. The registered office of the Issuer is located at 700 – 2nd Street SW, Suite 19-131, Calgary, ABT2P 2W2.

SOURCE EdgePoint Investment Group Inc.

Quote Show original content: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/March2022/10/c6425.html

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Manchin holds a press conference on the situation in Ukraine | Journal-news https://guwiv.com/manchin-holds-a-press-conference-on-the-situation-in-ukraine-journal-news/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/manchin-holds-a-press-conference-on-the-situation-in-ukraine-journal-news/ WASHINGTON — Banning Russian oil and increasing energy production here at home, while offering material support to Ukraine so it can fight back, are the best ways for the United States and its allies to harm Vladimir Putin’s war efforts, US Senator Joe Manchin said on Monday. Manchin, DW.Va., spoke at a video news conference […]]]>

WASHINGTON — Banning Russian oil and increasing energy production here at home, while offering material support to Ukraine so it can fight back, are the best ways for the United States and its allies to harm Vladimir Putin’s war efforts, US Senator Joe Manchin said on Monday.

Manchin, DW.Va., spoke at a video news conference with reporters from across the state to discuss the current situation in Ukraine, sanctions against Russia, U.S. energy policy and more .

“The bottom line is this: As an American citizen, I have never been more concerned for my country and the world than I am today about what Russia is doing,” he said.

He spoke of the memory of the Cuban Missile Crisis in the early 1960s and the fear of what might happen.

“I have never seen this type of attack on a democratic and freedom-loving country like Ukraine which has embraced democracy and the freedoms that come with it so well and been so savagely attacked,” the senator said. . “It’s Putin’s war. Don’t make a mistake.”

Manchin said he doesn’t refer to it as “Russia’s war” because he doesn’t think the Russian people would support this war. He also does not believe the Russian military was fully briefed and said they believed they were conducting a military exercise, not a full-scale invasion.

No one expected the resistance the Ukrainian people were facing, the senator said.

“The backbone and spine of the Ukrainian people is incredible, unbreakable and relentless,” Manchin said. “I have never been more inspired by anything than I have seen from (Ukrainian) President (Volodymyr) Zelenskyy and the Ukrainian people.”

Manchin took part in the Zoom call with Zelenskyy and other U.S. lawmakers on Saturday and spoke about how impressed he was with Zelenskyy’s commitment to protecting his country and his people.

“He knows he’s fighting on the right side of history and justice,” Manchin said.

The only thing Zelenskyy asked for was air cover. He was not asking for American pilots or planes. He was interested in planes from neighboring countries, which were once communist bloc countries, to which he can have access and which his people already know how to fly to mount an air response.

Manchin said that if these planes go to Ukraine, the United States and NATO must replace these planes so that these other countries are not left defenseless if Putin decides to attack elsewhere.

“We have to do this,” Manchin said, citing the commitment of all NATO countries to common defence.

This therefore does not require the commitment of American forces on the ground in Ukraine.

Manchin said he also called for an oil embargo against Russian oil and anything that would give money to Putin to finance “these atrocities against human beings”, including women, children, as well as for deliberately targeting civilians.

“I think we’re going in that direction,” he said. “There’s no reason why we can’t do this.”

Manchin reiterated his desire to increase national energy production, particularly in the Appalachian region, to compensate for what will not be allowed in by sanctions and bans against Russia. He thinks it can replace the 650,000 barrels per day purchased in the United States from Russia.

“We have to increase production and show the rest of the world that we have the ability not only to be independent and to be a superpower in the world, but also to help our allies,” Manchin said. “We are showing the commitment of the American people that we are not going to support a dollar of revenue that goes to Putin to do this kind of carnage and atrocities on the Ukrainian people.

“I don’t think that’s too much to ask.”

Manchin was asked about gasoline prices in the United States reaching an average of $4 per gallon. He said inflation was already underway and the war had not helped him, as the embargo was not yet fully enforced, but prices were rising anyway.

“It was a perfect storm,” he said, adding that he doesn’t know where it will go.

Manchin said the fuel is available in the United States for many needs, the country just needs to find a way to bring it to market. It calls for the completion of the Mountain Valley Pipeline in West Virginia, which will bring 2 billion cubic feet of gas per day to market.

“It can be accomplished in eight months,” the senator said. “(The pipeline) is 95% complete. This is the fastest thing we can do to get energy to market, and it needs to be done immediately.

Charcoal is also available. The senator wants to use what the United States has at its disposal.

“Putin has weaponized energy,” Manchin said, adding that the country must have an answer to this and have something as good or better. “We do. We have God-given energy and the best way to produce it.

He talked about increasing production on federal lands and in the Gulf of Mexico by removing restrictions and prohibitions in place and how technological innovations will allow us to do this as cleanly as possible.

Some worry that the pursuit of fossil fuels will curtail innovations to do it cleaner, as well as the exploration of more renewables. Manchin said they could do all that, but they would protect and defend the free world.

“Most of the world runs on fossil power,” he said. “It is reality.”

He thinks some in his party will not be receptive to this, but hopes the reality of the situation sets in and what needs to be done to meet this challenge.

The senator described Putin as a “thug” issuing threats and expecting the world to back down. Manchin said they couldn’t do that or other countries, including many NATO allies, would be next. There are 90,000 soldiers in Europe, mainly in Germany, and these numbers must be reinforced and show the military strength that NATO has.

“We are the defenders of freedom and people expect us to step up,” the senator said. “I think we will.”

Brett Dunlap can be reached at bdunlap@newsandsentinel.com.

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Creative Realities|Reflect Announces Winter ’22 Release with New Product Availability and Key CMS Software Enhancements https://guwiv.com/creative-realitiesreflect-announces-winter-22-release-with-new-product-availability-and-key-cms-software-enhancements/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/creative-realitiesreflect-announces-winter-22-release-with-new-product-availability-and-key-cms-software-enhancements/ Below are some of the improvements included in the Winter ’22 update. Non-contact production versionReflect Zero Touch – an innovative new approach to interactive experiences – was first introduced as a idea last summer, and the company is pleased to announce that it is now available for production deployment. Zero Touch can turn any screen […]]]>

Below are some of the improvements included in the Winter ’22 update.

Non-contact production version
Reflect Zero Touch – an innovative new approach to interactive experiences – was first introduced as a idea last summer, and the company is pleased to announce that it is now available for production deployment. Zero Touch can turn any screen into an interactive digital signage experience via a scannable QR code that controls the screen. Users can browse content, enter information, and even make purchases from their personal mobile device.

For organizations that want to deliver more engaging interactive experiences, but struggle with expensive touchscreen installations or screen cleaning issues, Zero Touch offers a cost-effective and secure way to engage and immerse users. Zero Touch also enables brands to extend the digital experience to the user’s mobile device even after leaving the proximity of the big screen, providing greater marketing reach and engagement opportunities.

Mobile user interface (UI) for Reflect Xperience
Launched in January 2021, Reflect Xperience is a reinvented way to access and use ReflectView, the premier platform for enterprise-class digital signage. Reflect Xperience enables brands to maintain centralized control of their digital signage content programs, while allowing individual users to easily and quickly schedule content specific to their location, easing the burden on content creation teams, improving local appeal of content programs and ensures consistency across locations. .

Reflect Xperience’s new mobile user interface makes scheduling faster, easier and even more intuitive by allowing any authorized user to update and schedule content directly from their mobile device.

Android media player support
ReflectView has long been the leading digital signage solution for Windows and BrightSign media players, and the company has now extended its reach to support Android media players. In addition to the vast majority of client applications using BrightSign and the range of specific applications for Windows media players, Android player support now allows customers to take advantage of system-on-chip solutions offered by major manufacturers. such as ELO and NEC. .

Customers can now deploy any combination of these three hardware platforms using ReflectView, benefiting from the industry’s most feature-rich, scalable and flexible digital signage platform.

“This opportunity highlights a beneficial expansion of our work with key partners like BrightSign,” said Lee Summers, former CEO of Reflect and now a member of the leadership team, as president of media and ad technology for the new company. “This new capability allows us to deploy BrightSign, or even Windows player solutions, in environments where customers have a legacy investment or also need to support Android players. Without Android support, Creative Realities and BrightSign may be blocked. these opportunities.”

Improved API support
The company continues to enhance its industry-leading network monitoring functionality with the addition of new device information APIs. These new API enhancements support calls to endpoints to periodically retrieve device state information, such as disconnected screens and various communication data from media players, including online state /offline, expired content and content read errors.

This approach dramatically reduces the amount of data needed to discern network status and identify endpoints that need attention. Additionally, these APIs allow IT managers to easily add performance insights from their digital signage network to existing monitoring tools, such as Power BI, further simplifying and optimizing network management.

“Reflect’s proven ability to consistently bring new and innovative features to enterprise digital signage customers is just one example of why merging our two companies made such sense” , said Rick Mills, CEO of Creative Realities. “The combination of Reflect’s world-class software capabilities and Creative Realities’ deployment and authoring services enables us to deliver exceptional value to our joint customers for many years to come.”

About Creative Realities, Inc.
Creative realities helps customers use the latest omnichannel technologies to inspire better customer experiences. The company designs, develops and deploys customer experiences for enterprise networks and actively provides SaaS and recurring support services in various vertical markets, including but not limited to automotive, ad networks, clothing and accessories, convenience stores, catering/QSR, game rooms, theater and stadium. The company operates through North America with active installations in more than 10 countries.

About Think
Now part of Creative Realities, Reflect provides powerful, cost-effective digital signage platforms and solutions, helping organizations create engaging experiences that engage staff and keep customers coming back for more. Reflect provides everything brands need, including strategy, creative services, robust ad traffic and content management systems, and media sales, all backed by the market leader. ReflectView and AdLogic software platforms.

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
This press release contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, and includes, among other things, discussions of our business strategies, product launches, future operations and capital resources. Words such as “estimates”, “projects”, “expects”, “anticipates”, “anticipates”, “plans”, “intends”, “believes”, “seeks”, “may” , “will”, “should”, “future”, “propose” and variations of these similar words or expressions (or negative versions of these words or expressions) are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements do not constitute not guarantees of future performance, conditions or results. They are based on the opinions, estimates and beliefs of management as of the date such statements are made, and are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties, assumptions and other factors, many of which are beyond our control, that may cause actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. of these risks are discussed in the section “Factor rs” contained in Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021 and the Company’s subsequent filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. Important factors, among others, that may affect actual results or results include: our ability to effectively integrate Reflect’s business operations, our customer retention strategy, growth, product development, market position , financial results and reserves, our ability to execute our business plan, our ability to retain key personnel, potential litigation, supply chain shortages and general economic and market conditions affecting on demand for our products and services, including those resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

SOURCE Creative Realities, Inc.

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Warren Buffett framed the past European crisis as a chance to buy cheap stocks https://guwiv.com/warren-buffett-framed-the-past-european-crisis-as-a-chance-to-buy-cheap-stocks/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 11:18:49 +0000 https://guwiv.com/warren-buffett-framed-the-past-european-crisis-as-a-chance-to-buy-cheap-stocks/ Warren Buffett touted past turmoil in Europe as a chance to buy cheap stocks. The Berkshire Hathaway CEO said the European debt crisis could lead to good business. Buffett recommended investors strike deals if they are bullish on the continent for the long term. Loading Something is loading. Warren Buffett strives to be “greedy when […]]]>
  • Warren Buffett touted past turmoil in Europe as a chance to buy cheap stocks.
  • The Berkshire Hathaway CEO said the European debt crisis could lead to good business.
  • Buffett recommended investors strike deals if they are bullish on the continent for the long term.

Warren Buffett strives to be “greedy when others are scared”. The billionaire stock-picker and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway endorsed this approach during the European debt crisis, urging investors to view the turmoil as a chance for good business.

“Just because there are problems in Europe — and there are a lot of problems in Europe, and they’re not going to go away quickly — doesn’t mean you’re not buying stocks,” Buffett said. told CNBC in 2013.

The Berkshire chief noted that his company rolled out $15.5 billion in three weeks in the fall of 2008 when the United States was in dire straits as the financial crisis took hold.

“It wasn’t because the news was good, it was because the prices were good,” Buffett explained. “If you think Europe is going to exist, which it certainly does, and it’s going to have enormous buying power… then you actually see the problems as an opportunity to buy.”

The seasoned investor recalled buying his first stock a few months after Pearl Harbor, when the United States was losing ground during World War II.

“I didn’t buy it because I thought losing the war was a great idea,” he told CNBC. “I bought it because I thought the stocks were cheap and eventually we would win the war, and the same in Europe.”

Buffett emphasized that he cares much more about the quality and valuation of a company than about its headquarters.

“If Coca-Cola was based in Amsterdam instead of Atlanta, we’d be happy to buy it,” he said. “We like good companies at low prices.”

Buffett said he was ready to invest in southern Europe, but a Greek, Italian or Spanish company would have to jump a higher hurdle to gain his support.

“If I understand the business well, trust and admire the management, and the price is right, we’ll buy there,” he said.

Buffett struck a similar chord at Berkshire’s annual meeting of shareholders in 2013, when asked if the sovereign debt crisis would prevent him from investing in the eurozone.

“It can create opportunities for us to buy businesses,” he said. “We would be delighted tomorrow to buy a large company in Europe that we like, and we would pay cash.”

The Berkshire boss took a similar stance in 2014, telling investors they should hold stocks during a war, not cash, gold or bitcoin.

Read more: Bank of America predicts a Russian oil export ban could push prices up to $200 a barrel – and explains why it could trigger a global recession or stock market crash

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