world press – GUWIV http://guwiv.com/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 10:01:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://guwiv.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/guw-150x150.png world press – GUWIV http://guwiv.com/ 32 32 RSF opens press freedom center in Lviv, delivery of first bulletproof vests https://guwiv.com/rsf-opens-press-freedom-center-in-lviv-delivery-of-first-bulletproof-vests/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 12:54:01 +0000 https://guwiv.com/rsf-opens-press-freedom-center-in-lviv-delivery-of-first-bulletproof-vests/ “We came here to express our solidarity with Ukrainian journalists and provide them with the best possible assistance in covering the war,” said RSF Secretary General Christophe Deloire. Accompanied by Oksana Romaniuk, director of the Ukrainian Institute of Mass Information (IMI), and Alexandre Query, coordinator of the center, Deloire described the activities of this now […]]]>

“We came here to express our solidarity with Ukrainian journalists and provide them with the best possible assistance in covering the war,” said RSF Secretary General Christophe Deloire.

Accompanied by Oksana Romaniuk, director of the Ukrainian Institute of Mass Information (IMI), and Alexandre Query, coordinator of the center, Deloire described the activities of this now operational hub in western Ukraine.

The first personal protective equipment for journalists has been distributed in recent days with the help of the Berlin network for reporting on Eastern Europe (n-ost) and the Swedish press group Bonnier.

Bonnier collected 30 bulletproof vests and helmets from its various media outlets (Dagens Nyheter, Dagens industri and To express), with the help of the Schibsted Group and the Swedish national broadcaster, Swedish television.

“We will distribute body armor in the hottest spots in the country,” Romaniuk said, referring to violence against journalists covering the war in Ukraine in recent days. Since the beginning of the Russian offensive, at least 12 journalists have been deliberately targeted by armed fighters and four – two reporters from the Danish newspaper Ekstra Bladet and two members of a crew reporting for the UK Sky News TV – were shot and wounded.

RSF called on the Polish and Ukrainian authorities to facilitate the supply of bulletproof vests to the centre. The circulation of equipment requires specific authorizations which delay their rapid delivery to Ukraine. Deloire also urged democratic countries to issue visas to journalists and called on Russia to respect UN Security Council Resolution 2222 on the protection of journalists.

“We salute the courage of the journalists,” said Query, the center’s coordinator. “With this center we fight for media independence in Ukraine and beyond.” This week, the center will begin providing physical safety and first aid training to journalists attending in person or via videoconference.

RSF thanks the city of Lviv for its hospitality, as well as the Limelight Foundation and the Adessium Foundation in the Netherlands, the Schöpflin Foundation in Germany, the King Baudouin Foundation in Belgium, the Oak Foundation in the United Kingdom, the Fritt Ord Foundation in Norway and Open Society Foundations.

Ukraine is ranked 97th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2021 World Press Freedom Index, while Russia is ranked 150th.

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Government rejects ranking on World Press Freedom Index, question methodology and sample size https://guwiv.com/government-rejects-ranking-on-world-press-freedom-index-question-methodology-and-sample-size/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/government-rejects-ranking-on-world-press-freedom-index-question-methodology-and-sample-size/ New Delhi: In response to India’s ranking of 142nd in its world press freedom index, the government clarified its position by saying it does not subscribe to the views and rankings of Reporters Without Borders. While answering Congressman Manish Tewari’s question in the Lok Sabha regarding the latest ranking of the World Press Freedom Index, […]]]>

New Delhi: In response to India’s ranking of 142nd in its world press freedom index, the government clarified its position by saying it does not subscribe to the views and rankings of Reporters Without Borders.

While answering Congressman Manish Tewari’s question in the Lok Sabha regarding the latest ranking of the World Press Freedom Index, Minister of State for Home Affairs Nityanand Rai said that the methodology used by the foreign NGO Reporters Without Borders was questionable.

According to the PTI news agency, Rai said India’s disapproval is based on “very small sample size, little or no weighting for fundamentals of democracy, adoption of questionable methodology and non-transparent, the lack of a clear definition of freedom of the press, etc.”

ALSO READ: Drone Downed At Indo-Pakistan Border In Punjab, BSF Suspected Smuggling Supply

Meanwhile, answering the question about the closure of the Kashmir Press Club on January 18, Rai said there was no registered body with that name.

The minister added that there is no elected management body of the club because the club as a registered body has ceased to exist and has not registered under the law of 1860 on registration of companies.

Sharing details, Rai informed the Lok Sabha that the Estates Department of the UT administration took over the government building where the Kashmir Press Club was operated, on January 17, in the presence of the Executive Magistrate of Srinagar and the government building rolled out the static guard for its protection.

While answering another question, Rai said that according to the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) report, the number of cases registered under the UAPA counter-terrorism law in the country in 2020 is 796, according to the agency.

A total of 1,321 people were arrested under the UAPA and 116 people were acquitted. A total of 80 people were convicted under UAPA in the country in 2020, he said.

(With PTI inputs)

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Nominations now open for World Press Freedom Canada’s 2022 Freedom of the Press and Spencer Moore Awards https://guwiv.com/nominations-now-open-for-world-press-freedom-canadas-2022-freedom-of-the-press-and-spencer-moore-awards/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/nominations-now-open-for-world-press-freedom-canadas-2022-freedom-of-the-press-and-spencer-moore-awards/ OTTAWA (ON), February 3, 2022 /CNW/ – World Press Freedom Canada (WPFC) is pleased to announce that nominations for its 2022 Press Freedom Award are now open. The award honors a journalist or media worker for their outstanding contribution to press freedom by Canada during 2021. The award is given to candidates who demonstrate that […]]]>

OTTAWA (ON), February 3, 2022 /CNW/ – World Press Freedom Canada (WPFC) is pleased to announce that nominations for its 2022 Press Freedom Award are now open. The award honors a journalist or media worker for their outstanding contribution to press freedom by Canada during 2021.

The award is given to candidates who demonstrate that their public service work has been frustrated by a cloak of secrecy, legal maneuvering, political intimidation, or tactics that put their safety or career at risk.

WPFC is also seeking nominations for our Spencer Moore Award, which honors an individual who, throughout their career, has demonstrated a determined pursuit of freedom of the press and freedom of information.

“Freedom of the press is fragile. We have seen evidence of this with the recent arrests of Canadian journalists in Fairy Creek who were doing their job, the crackdown on media outlets in hong kong and the increased use of disinformation globally. In December, the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to journalists for the first time since 1935, highlighting the role a free press plays in protecting democracy,” said the WPFC President. Heather Bakken. “For these reasons, the WPFC is honored to reward journalists who continue to confront secrecy, defy intimidation and overcome dangerous obstacles in their pursuit of the truth. Without them, the stories that reveal the facts that shape our shared reality could not be told.”

The winner of the Press Freedom Prize receives a $2,000 award from World Press Freedom Canada and a certificate from the Canadian Commission for UNESCO. Spencer Moore Prize winner is honored $1,000.

The deadline for both nominations is March 15.

Support for the awards is provided by World Press Freedom Canada’s lead sponsor, the Canadian Bankers Association and our partner, the Canadian Commission for UNESCO.

The 2021 Press Freedom Prize was awarded jointly to The Narwhal’s Sarah Cox for his work in uncovering covert and critical analyzes of faults at the Site C dam in British Columbia; and to Nathan Vander KlippeGlobe and Mail alumnus China correspondent who reported on China Uyghur detention camps.

Other winners in the award’s 19-year history include:

Kenneth Jackson (Indigenous Peoples Television Network); Michael Robinson (Telegraph-Journal); Catherine Gannon (Associated Press); Michelle Langposthumously (Calgary Herald); Stephane Maher and Glen McGregor (Postmedia); Daniel LeBlanc (Globe and mail); Gilles Toupin and Joel Denis Bellavance (The Press); Tarek Fatah (author and columnist); Juliet O’Neill (Ottawa Citizen); Andrew McIntosh (National Post); and Kim Bolan (Vancouver Sun).

Details and nomination requirements can be found here.

About World Press Freedom Canada

Global Press Freedom Canada is a Ottawanon-profit voluntary organization that promotes freedom of expression and media rights. It celebrates UNESCO’s World Press Freedom Day by paying tribute to the laureates. This year, World Press Freedom Day is May 3.

follow us on @CDN_WPF and @worldpressfreedomcanada

SOURCE World Press Freedom Canada

For more information: [email protected]

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‘Systematic fear’: How India undermined press freedom in Kashmir | Press Freedom News https://guwiv.com/systematic-fear-how-india-undermined-press-freedom-in-kashmir-press-freedom-news/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/systematic-fear-how-india-undermined-press-freedom-in-kashmir-press-freedom-news/ For five years, Sajad Gul has written about the conflict ravaging his homeland of Indian-administered Kashmir, a disputed Himalayan territory where armed rebellion and brutal Indian repression have raged for more than three decades. That changed on a snowy Wednesday night this month with a knock on his door. Gul found himself surrounded by Indian […]]]>

For five years, Sajad Gul has written about the conflict ravaging his homeland of Indian-administered Kashmir, a disputed Himalayan territory where armed rebellion and brutal Indian repression have raged for more than three decades.

That changed on a snowy Wednesday night this month with a knock on his door.

Gul found himself surrounded by Indian soldiers wielding automatic rifles who loaded him into a vehicle and fled, winding their way down the snow-covered trail to Hajin, a quiet village about 32 km (20 miles) from Srinagar, the main town. of the area, said his mother. , Gulshana, which uses only one name.

Journalists have long faced various threats in Indian-administered Kashmir and found themselves caught between warring parties. But their situation has worsened considerably since India revoked the region’s semi-autonomy in 2019, placing it under a severe security and communications lockdown and the media in a black hole.

A year later, the government’s new media policy aimed to more effectively control the press to censor independent reporting. Dozens of people have been arrested, interrogated and investigated under tough anti-terrorism laws.

Fear of reprisals caused the local press to wither under pressure.

“Indian authorities seem determined to prevent journalists from doing their job,” said Steven Butler, Asia program coordinator for the US-based Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ).

Kashmiri journalists work during a surprise search of pedestrians by security forces in Srinagar [Dar Yasin/AP]

Gul’s arrest, which CPJ condemned, underscored the rapid erosion of press freedom and the criminalization of journalists in Indian-administered Kashmir.

Police told Gul’s family that he was arrested for inciting people to “use violence and disturb public order”. A police statement later described him as “habitual of spreading misinformation” and “false narratives” on social media.

He was detained days after his single tweet linked to a video clip of a protest against Indian rule, following the killing of a Kashmiri rebel. He spent 11 days locked up before a local court granted him bail.

Instead of releasing Gul, authorities charged him in a new case under the strict Public Security Law, which allows authorities to jail anyone for up to two years without trial.

“My son is not a criminal,” Gulshana said. “He was just writing. »

“Direct attack on free media”

The media has always been tightly controlled in Indian-administered Kashmir, the country’s only Muslim-majority region. Arm twisting and fear have been widely used to intimidate the press since 1989, when rebels began fighting Indian soldiers in a bid to establish an independent Kashmir or a union with Pakistan.

Pakistan controls the other part of Kashmir and both counties fiercely claim the entire territory.

The fighting left tens of thousands dead. Yet the various media outlets in Indian-administered Kashmir have thrived despite relentless pressure from Indian authorities and rebel groups.

That changed in 2019, when authorities began bringing criminal charges against some journalists. Several of them were forced to reveal their sources, while others were physically assaulted.

“The authorities have created systematic fear and launched a direct attack on free media. There is complete intolerance of even a single critical word,” said Anuradha Bhasin, editor of the Kashmir Times, a leading English daily established in 1954.

Journalist Aasif Sultan handcuffed as he surrendered to police custodyKashmiri journalist Aasif Sultan handcuffed after his 2018 arrest [File: Saqib Majeed/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images]

Bhasin was among the few to petition India’s Supreme Court, resulting in a partial restoration of communications services after the 2019 power outage, which the government said was needed to block anti-protests. Indian.

But she soon found herself in the crosshairs of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government.

Bhasin’s legacy newspaper office in Srinagar, operating out of a rented government building, was sealed off by authorities without notice. His staff were not allowed to take out equipment.

“They are killing local media except those who are willing to become government reporters,” Bhasin said.

Under Modi, press freedom in India has steadily declined since its first election in 2014. Last year, India was ranked 142nd in the World Press Freedom Index by the media watchdog Reporters Without Borders behind Afghanistan and Zimbabwe.

Nowhere has this fall been more flagrant than in Indian-administered Kashmir.

Authorities pressured newspapers by reprimanding editors and depriving them of advertising funds, their main source of income, to cool aggressive reporting.

“We have just tried to stay afloat and have barely been able to do proper journalism for various reasons, one being that we mainly depend on government advertisements,” said Sajjad Haider, editor of Kashmir Observer. .

For the most part, the newspapers appear to have cooperated and self-censored the stories, fearing they would be branded anti-national by a government that equates criticism with secessionism.

There have been press crackdowns in the region before, especially during times of mass public uprisings. But the ongoing crackdown is significantly worse.

Closure of the Kashmir Press Club

Last week, a few pro-Indian government journalists, with the help of armed police, took control of the Kashmir Press Club, the only independent press club in the valley. Authorities shut it down a day later, drawing heavy criticism from journalistic organizations.

A sealed lock hangs on the door of the closed Kashmir Press ClubA sealed lock hangs from the door of the closed Kashmir Press Club building in Srinagar [Dar Yasin/AP Photo]

The Editors Guild of India accused the government of being “brazenly complicit” and called it an “armed takeover”. Reporters Without Borders called it an “undeclared coup” and said the region is “gradually turning into a black hole for news and information”.

The Press Club is the latest civil society group in the region to face growing government repression. For the past two years, authorities have prevented the Kashmir High Court Bar Association and the Kashmir Chamber of Commerce from holding internal elections.

The government defended its decision citing “a potential public order situation” and “the safety of bona fide journalists”. He said the club had failed to register under a new law and hold elections for a new governing body.

The club said a new registration was granted by authorities after “six months of rigorous police checks” at the end of December, but was “on hold” a day later for unknown reasons.

The government’s decision contrasts sharply with its policies in the predominantly Hindu city of Jammu, where another press club continues to operate without having held an election for nearly five years.

Majid Maqbool, a local journalist, said the club has extended its institutional support to journalists working in difficult conditions. “It was like a second home for us,” he said.

Kashmiri Journalists Discuss Kashmir Press Club Shutdown Kashmiri journalists attend a meeting to discuss the closure of the Kashmir Press Club [Dar Yasin/AP]

Kashmir’s local journalists were often the only eyes on the ground for global audiences, especially after New Delhi banned foreign journalists from the region – unless they had official approval – a few years ago. years. Most of the reporting has focused on the Kashmir conflict and government crackdowns.

Authorities are now seeking to control any narrative seen as opposing the broad consensus in India that the region is an integral part of the country.

In this battle of stories, journalists have been reprimanded by authorities for not using the term “terrorists” to refer to separatist rebels. Government statements appear mostly on the front page, and statements by pro-India Kashmiri groups critical of Modi’s policies are rarely published.

Newspaper editorials reflecting the conflict are largely absent. Rare reporting on rights abuses is often dismissed as politically motivated fabrications, emboldening the region’s authoritarian military and police to muzzle the press.

Some journalists have been subjected to grueling hours of police questioning, a tactic condemned by the United Nations last year.

Aakash Hassan, a Kashmiri freelance journalist who writes mainly for the international press, said he has been summoned by Indian authorities at least seven times in the past two years.

Hassan said sometimes officers questioned his motives for reporting and “told me how to do journalism the right way.”

“It’s a way of deterring us from pressing charges,” he said, adding that police also questioned his parents several times and probed their finances.

“Sometimes I wonder if it’s worth being a journalist in Kashmir,” Hassan said. “But I know, silence doesn’t help.”

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In Kashmir, India beats freedom of the press – and journalists https://guwiv.com/in-kashmir-india-beats-freedom-of-the-press-and-journalists/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/in-kashmir-india-beats-freedom-of-the-press-and-journalists/ SRINAGAR – For five years, Sajad Gul has written about the conflict ravaging his homeland, a disputed Himalayan territory where violent armed rebellion and India’s brutal counterinsurgency have raged for more than three decades. That changed on a snowy Wednesday evening in January with a knock at his house. Gul was surrounded by Indian soldiers […]]]>

SRINAGAR – For five years, Sajad Gul has written about the conflict ravaging his homeland, a disputed Himalayan territory where violent armed rebellion and India’s brutal counterinsurgency have raged for more than three decades.

That changed on a snowy Wednesday evening in January with a knock at his house. Gul was surrounded by Indian soldiers armed with automatic rifles who loaded him into a vehicle and sped off, crossing the snowy track of Hajin, a quiet village about 20 miles from Srinagar, the region’s main town. , said her mother, Gulshana, who only uses one name.

Journalists have long faced various threats in Indian-controlled Kashmir and found themselves caught between belligerents. But their situation has worsened considerably since India revoked the region’s semi-autonomy in 2019, throwing Kashmir under a severe security and communications lockdown and the media into a black hole. A year later, the government’s new media policy aimed to more effectively control the press to censor independent reporting.

A d

Dozens of people have been arrested, interrogated and investigated under tough anti-terrorism laws. Fearing reprisals, the local press largely withered under the pressure.

“Indian authorities seem determined to prevent journalists from doing their job,” said Steven Butler, Asia program coordinator for the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists.

Gul’s arrest, which CPJ condemned, underscored the rapid erosion of press freedom and the criminalization of journalists in Kashmir.

Police told Gul’s family that he was arrested for inciting people to “use violence and disturb public order”. A police statement later described him as “habitual of spreading misinformation” and “false narratives” on social media.

A d

He was detained days after his single tweet linked to a video clip of a protest against Indian rule, following the killing of a Kashmiri rebel. He spent 11 days locked up before a local court granted him bail.

Instead of releasing Gul, authorities charged him in a new case under the Public Security Law, which allows officials to jail anyone for up to two years without trial.

“My son is not a criminal,” Gulshana said. “He was just writing. »

The media has always been tightly controlled in the Indian part of Muslim-majority Kashmir. Arm twisting and fear have been widely used to intimidate the press since 1989, when rebels began fighting Indian soldiers in a bid to establish an independent Kashmir or a union with Pakistan. Pakistan controls the other part of Kashmir and both counties fiercely claim the entire territory.

The fighting left tens of thousands dead. Yet Kashmir’s diverse media have thrived despite relentless pressure from Indian authorities and rebel groups.

A d

That changed in 2019, when authorities began bringing criminal charges against some journalists. Several of them were forced to reveal their sources, while others were physically assaulted.

“The authorities have created systematic fear and launched a direct attack on free media. There is complete intolerance of even a single critical word,” said Anuradha Bhasin, editor of the Kashmir Times, a leading English daily established in 1954.

Bhasin was among the few to petition India’s Supreme Court, resulting in a partial restoration of communications services after the 2019 power outage, which the government said was needed to block anti-protests. Indian.

But she soon found herself in the crosshairs of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government.

A d

Bhasin’s legacy newspaper office in Srinagar, operating out of a rented government building, was sealed off by authorities without notice. His staff were not allowed to take out equipment.

“They are killing local media except those who are willing to become government reporters,” Bhasin said.

Under Modi, press freedom in India has steadily declined since its first election in 2014. Last year, India was ranked 142nd in the World Press Freedom Index by the media watchdog Reporters Without Borders behind Afghanistan and Zimbabwe.

Nowhere has this slide been more flagrant than in Kashmir.

Authorities pressured newspapers by reprimanding editors and depriving them of advertising funds, their main source of income, to cool aggressive reporting.

For the most part, the newspapers appear to have cooperated and self-censored the stories, fearing they would be branded anti-national by a government that equates criticism with secessionism.

A d

“We have just tried to stay afloat and have barely been able to do proper journalism for various reasons, one being that we mainly depend on government advertisements,” said Sajjad Haider, editor of Kashmir Observer. .

There have been press crackdowns in the region before, especially during times of mass public uprisings. But the ongoing crackdown is significantly worse.

Last week, a few pro-Indian government journalists, with the help of armed police, took control of the only independent media club in the Kashmir Valley. Authorities shut it down a day later, drawing heavy criticism from journalistic organizations.

The Editors Guild of India accused the government of being “brazenly complicit” and called it an “armed takeover”. Reporters Without Borders called it an “undeclared coup” and said the region is “gradually turning into a black hole for news and information”.

The press club is the latest civil society group in the region to face growing government repression. For the past two years, authorities have prevented the Kashmir High Court Bar Association and the Kashmir Chamber of Commerce from holding internal elections.

A d

The government defended its decision citing “a potential public order situation” and “the safety of bona fide journalists”. He said the club had failed to register under a new law and hold elections for a new governing body.

The club said a new registration was granted by authorities after “six months of rigorous police checks” at the end of December, but was “on hold” a day later for unknown reasons.

The government’s move contrasts sharply with its policies in the Hindu-dominated city of Jammu, where another press club continues to operate without having held elections for nearly half a decade.

Majid Maqbool, a local journalist, said the club has extended its institutional support to journalists working in difficult conditions. “It was like a second home for us,” he said.

Kashmir’s local journalists were often the only eyes on the ground for global audiences, especially after New Delhi banned foreign journalists from the region without official approval a few years ago. Most of the reporting has focused on the Kashmir conflict and government crackdowns. The authorities are now seeking to control any rhetoric opposing the broad consensus in India that the region is an integral part of the country.

A d

In this battle of stories, journalists have been reprimanded by authorities for not using the term “terrorists” to refer to separatist rebels. Government statements appear mostly on the front page, and statements by pro-India Kashmiri groups critical of Modi’s policies are barely published.

Newspaper editorials reflecting the conflict are largely absent. Rare reporting on rights abuses is often dismissed as politically motivated fabrications, emboldening the region’s authoritarian military and police to muzzle the press.

Some journalists have been subjected to grueling hours of police questioning, a tactic condemned by the United Nations last year.

Aakash Hassan, a Kashmiri freelance journalist who writes mainly for the international press, said he has been summoned by Indian authorities at least seven times in the past two years.

Hassan said that sometimes officers question his motives for reporting and “lecture me about how to do journalism the right way”.

A d

“It’s a way of deterring us from pressing charges,” he said, adding that police also questioned his parents several times and probed their finances.

“Sometimes I wonder if it’s worth being a journalist in Kashmir,” Hassan said. “But I know, silence doesn’t help.”

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Not a numbers game: nuance needed to measure press freedom in Southeast Asia | News | Eco-Enterprise https://guwiv.com/not-a-numbers-game-nuance-needed-to-measure-press-freedom-in-southeast-asia-news-eco-enterprise/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 07:18:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/not-a-numbers-game-nuance-needed-to-measure-press-freedom-in-southeast-asia-news-eco-enterprise/ “By writing, they are trying to uplift their communities and shine a light on stories of injustice,” said Sahnaz Melasandy, Network and Report Coordinator. co-author. More than numbers Reporters Without Borders (RSF) recorded this at least 76 journalists have been imprisoned in 2021 and one has been killed in Southeast Asia. The majority of countries […]]]>

“By writing, they are trying to uplift their communities and shine a light on stories of injustice,” said Sahnaz Melasandy, Network and Report Coordinator. co-author.

More than numbers

Reporters Without Borders (RSF) recorded this at least 76 journalists have been imprisoned in 2021 and one has been killed in Southeast Asia. The majority of countries in the region are poorly rated in its World Press Freedom Index with Brunei, Laos, Singapore and Vietnam ranking among the bottom 30 countries in the world. The France-based non-governmental organization found that Asia has some of the highest rates of abuse against journalists covering the environment.

But most global indices and reports on media freedom only show a snapshot of what’s happening in the region and don’t account for nuances within and between countries, the researchers said. “It’s important to listen to what the people on the ground have to say, in addition to academics and leaders of Western institutions,” said Fadhilah F. Primandari, democracy researcher and co-author of the report.

For example, RSF has a secretariat and a council composed mainly of European members. His freedom index is determined through an online questionnaire of 87 questions, which is sent to media professionals, lawyers and sociologists selected by the organization. Scores are then compiled based on these responses combined with data on abuse and violence against journalists – compiled by the researchers and their networks of correspondents in 130 countries – during the period assessed.

Instead, New Naratif researchers conducted a qualitative analysis of 44 independent media workers, those who do not work in state-owned or state-affiliated media, from eight different countries, including Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Singapore.

The susceptibility of subjects varies by geographic area, the research found. Media workers could face health problemsal and police brutality due to the production of stories that criticize governments, prominent politicians and the military. Other more “passive” but corrosive methods include regulatory harassment, restrictions and legal action by governments and members of the public. Anti-media propaganda and digital attacks have also been deployed to muzzle press freedom.

Increased digitization has opened a new avenue for attacks on media workers allowing the public to engage directly with publishers and writers. Internet trolls distort online discourse with reactionary and negative comments. Doxxing (finding and publishing private or identifying information about media workers) and hacking are other forms of Internet attacks that put their security at risk.

Sensitive and risky hot topics by Southeast Asian countries. Source: New Story

To ensure stories are reported fairly, independent media workers should be able to safely access key sources of information and data, Primandari said. “It goes beyond finding information online, but also the ability to interview and question officials.”

“Sometimes government agencies can be more skeptical of independent media, so they don’t justify their access. It is therefore difficult for independent media to hold governments accountable,” she added.

The Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated these challenges. In Malaysia, for example, press conferences were moved online and only state media were invited to participate, according to the report.

Beyond government sources, independent journalists in the region also have difficulty approaching the general public for information due to a culture of fear and intimidation. “If the general public is afraid to speak out, journalists are unable to uncover in-depth stories or write critically about what is happening in society at large,” Primandari said.

Identifying issues that impede media freedom in the region would help ensure that local issues are not only reported by international news outlets. “We are slowly starting to see a pivot towards people in Southeast Asia taking charge of their own stories by creating these spaces in the region themselves. Local communities write their own stories and reclaim agency over their narratives, even though many factors work against them,” she said.

The intersection between identities and media freedom

Current measures do not take into account identity markers that can affect a journalist’s ability to do their job. Nationality, age, gender and sexuality, class, geographic location, race, as well as professional status play a role in the freedom with which media professionals can operate in the region.

“Independent media workers tend to come from often marginalized backgrounds, so ensuring the security of their freedom and rights is one of the most important things we need to do,” Hassan said.

Rural media workers are more likely to be victims of killings and beatings than their urban counterparts, with many cases going unreported, the researchers found.

Female media workers face more difficulties as they may face sexual harassment and gender-based intimidation from colleagues and in the field when reporting. This, again, is a factor that varies from country to country in Southeast Asia.

The art of content creation and concealment

To stay safe, media workers have devised ways to adapt and adjust their media content.

– Modify the tone and framing of the topics covered, for example by using more conservative titles;

– Thorough editing and cross-checking of their work to guard against accusations of defamation;

– Use creative visual metaphors;

– Reporting in English rather than local languages;

– Avoid certain subjects.

Future research and studies should be aware of how identities shape the experiences of media workers and how certain groups are systematically silenced, marginalized and not given as much access to participate in such research projects. , the researchers pointed out.

The creation of a space of regional solidarity was important to facilitate the exchange of knowledge and support between media workers in a climate that is hostile to them.

“Many of our governments are very unoriginal in their tactics to oppress media workers, so there is potential here to stand together and learn from each other,” Melasandy said.

“It will show the government and the rest of the world that independent media in Southeast Asia is a force to be reckoned with and cannot be crushed by individual governments,” echoed Hassan.

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Press freedom fighter Jodie Ginsberg expands her fight https://guwiv.com/press-freedom-fighter-jodie-ginsberg-expands-her-fight/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/press-freedom-fighter-jodie-ginsberg-expands-her-fight/ Jodie Ginsberg was running a small free speech organization in London in 2014 when Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab walked into her office. He had recently been released from prison for organizing democratic rallies during the Arab Spring and posting tweets that the Bahrain monarchy found offensive. He made Ms Ginsberg realize how important […]]]>

Jodie Ginsberg was running a small free speech organization in London in 2014 when Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab walked into her office.

He had recently been released from prison for organizing democratic rallies during the Arab Spring and posting tweets that the Bahrain monarchy found offensive. He made Ms Ginsberg realize how important it was for her colleagues who remained in prison to know that people were fighting for them.

When Mr. Rajab was again thrown into prison soon after his return to Bahrain, Ms. Ginsberg held vigils outside the Bahraini embassy, ​​stayed in regular contact with his family to document his condition and campaigned vehemently for his release.

“One of the reasons my case became known internationally was Jodie,” Mr Rajab said of Bahrain’s modern capital, Manama, where he is serving the final year of his final sentence, for voicing anti-government dissent on Twitter, from home.

The Committee to Protect Journalists, one of the world’s largest press watchdog organizations, recently announced that Ms Ginsberg would become its new chair in April.

Ms. Ginsberg, veteran journalist and free speech advocate, takes over at a time when journalists are increasingly under threat, with a record number of incarcerations around the world and press freedom attacks on the rise in the United States.

It’s a challenge she’s passionate about, says Ginsberg. An optimist who has helped many outspoken artists and imprisoned activists gain international attention, she believes “journalism is essential if we are to have free, independent and tolerant societies”.

“The experience of being persecuted for your work is extremely isolating,” Ms Ginsberg said, referring to Mr Rajab’s case. “And it’s even worse if you don’t feel that people are showing solidarity.”

Growing up in a middle-class family in Potters Bar, a suburban town just north of London, Ms Ginsberg carried a pencil and paper with her as a child and regularly broadcast newscasts for her grandparents , posing as a foreign correspondent like the BBC’s Kate Adie. Hired by Reuters out of graduate school, Ms Ginsberg soon got her big break by traveling to Johannesburg as a business correspondent. Later, she ran the large London bureau of Reuters, overseeing a team of 45 reporters, writing about the 2008 banking crisis and covering the royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton.

Although her former boss, David Schlesinger, described her as passionate and fearless, Ms Ginsberg said she never personally felt threatened because of her work. It was later, after becoming the head of a small free speech nonprofit, Index on Censorship, that she became passionate about protecting journalists, even in the seemingly least likely: the United States.

“In 2018, I was on a press freedom mission in the United States and I clearly remember these two White House correspondents talking about how they received death threats on a daily basis, as if c was normal,” she said from her home in Cambridge, England. “I was horrified.”

“It made me go from a journalist by profession to a journalist lawyer,” she said.

Ms Ginsberg has spent the past two years heading the European branch of Internews, a large non-profit organization that trains and supports freelance journalists around the world. Three days after arriving in March 2020, the company announced a trial lockdown due to a strange new global virus. Employees have still not returned to the London office.

Understanding that freelance journalists already working on shoestring budgets would need to cover the pandemic quickly, she helped launch a new fund that offered some 180 grants to journalists and news organizations around the world.

“I strongly believe that we can only make decisions about ourselves and our world if we have the information to do so,” said Ms Ginsberg, 44, a married mother of two.

The Committee to Protect Journalists was created in 1981 by two American journalists who had worked in parallel to raise awareness about the case of Alcibíades González Delvalle, a Paraguayan columnist and critic of his country’s military government who had been arrested for one of his columns.

A few weeks after their campaign, Mr. González Delvalle was released. Realizing that no other organization was monitoring press freedom from the United States, the two journalists, Michael Massing and Laurie Nadel, assembled a board of distinguished, award-winning journalists from major organizations such as The New York Times, The New Yorker, the Washington Post and CBS. Renowned CBS News anchor Walter Cronkite, recently retired, has signed on as honorary chairman of the group. Its mandate was to protect journalists outside America who did not have First Amendment shelter or ready access to human rights lawyers.

“We felt we had those protections and privileges, unlike other countries,” said Massing, who still sits on the board. “We would use our own influence and prestige in America to help journalists in other countries.”

Since then, CPJ has grown into one of the world’s leading press freedom organizations, with an annual budget of $10 million, more than 50 staff and contractors, and a global presence that stretches from the Nigerian capital, Abuja, Guatemala City and New Delhi.

In 2001, it broadened its mandate from raising awareness of journalists under threat to directly helping some of them, offering emergency funds to hire lawyers, obtain medical treatment or flee their country.

Last year, the organization helped around 60 journalists and their families evacuate Afghanistan after the Taliban seized power.

CPJ is currently assisting with the case of Jeffrey Moyo, a Zimbabwean freelance journalist who works with the New York Times and faces criminal charges under the country’s immigration law for helping two Times reporters enter the Zimbabwe last year.

The organization’s successes, however, have been overwhelmed by increasing attacks on journalists, not just in places with authoritarian governments, but in the United States, where former President Donald J. Trump has decried the press several times, a tactic he has continued since his departure. office a year ago.

When CPJ’s longtime executive director Joel Simon announced he would step down effective late last year, he said it was with waning optimism.

“The decline in press freedom has produced more cases – more journalists who need support, so you have to respond to those people,” Mr Simon said in an interview. “But if you do that exclusively, you kind of swim in place. Ultimately, you want the situation to improve. So how do you both support journalists who are currently under threat and address broader challenges to press freedom in a constructive way? »

Ms. Ginsberg agrees. “We want journalists to be safe so that people have access to a free and independent press,” she said. “And that means addressing systemic issues that threaten the safety of journalists, not just working on individual cases.”

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UNESCO calls for nominations for World Press Freedom Prize https://guwiv.com/unesco-calls-for-nominations-for-world-press-freedom-prize/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/unesco-calls-for-nominations-for-world-press-freedom-prize/ The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)/Guillermo Cano invites nominations for its World Press Freedom Prize The prize aims to reward, each year, each person, organization or institution that has made a notable contribution to the defense and/or promotion of freedom of the press anywhere in the world, especially if risks have been […]]]>

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)/Guillermo Cano invites nominations for its World Press Freedom Prize

The prize aims to reward, each year, each person, organization or institution that has made a notable contribution to the defense and/or promotion of freedom of the press anywhere in the world, especially if risks have been incurred.

According to UNESCO, Member States, international/regional organizations or professional/non-governmental organizations working in the field of journalism and freedom of expression can nominate up to three candidates.

Journalists, organizations or institutions that promote press freedom around the world can be nominated for a $25,000 prize.

The recipient will be recognized at the World Press Freedom Day Ceremony to be held on May 3, 2022 in Punta del Este, Uruguay.

Nominations must be submitted in English or French and should include a brief biography or story of the nominee.

UNESCO says the prize is funded by Guillermo Cano Isaza Foundation (Colombia), Helsingin Sanomat Foundation (Finland), Namibia Media Trust (Namibia) and Democracy & Media Foundation Stichting Democracy & Media (Netherlands).

– Advertising –

The deadline for submitting applications is February 15, 2022. Interested candidates can submit them here.

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Center disagrees with India’s ranking in World Press Freedom Index https://guwiv.com/center-disagrees-with-indias-ranking-in-world-press-freedom-index/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/center-disagrees-with-indias-ranking-in-world-press-freedom-index/ On Tuesday, the Center disagreed with India’s low ranking in the World Press Freedom Index prepared by media watchdog Reporters Without Borders. The government claimed the report was based on a small sample and gave little or no importance to the “fundamentals of democracy”. Information and Broadcasting Minister Anurag Thakur made the remarks in a […]]]>

On Tuesday, the Center disagreed with India’s low ranking in the World Press Freedom Index prepared by media watchdog Reporters Without Borders. The government claimed the report was based on a small sample and gave little or no importance to the “fundamentals of democracy”.

Information and Broadcasting Minister Anurag Thakur made the remarks in a written response to Lok Sabha while answering a question about India’s low ranking in the index.

In March, Reporters Without Borders said India ranked 142nd out of 180 countries for press freedom. He added that the nation was classified as “bad” for journalism.

The media watchdog, in a report released in December, said India was among the five most dangerous countries in terms of journalists killed globally this year.

The Union Minister was asked whether the government had identified the reason for India’s poor ranking and whether any corrective action had been taken.

Thakur informed the Lower House that the government “did not subscribe” to the views of Reporters Without Borders and its report ranking the countries because the number of participants interviewed was not sufficient.

The minister also claimed the report had a “questionable methodology” for the investigation. Thakur also claimed that Reporters Without Borders lacked a clear definition of press freedom.

Thakur was also asked if the Center was aware of journalists falling under the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act in Tripura and criticism of the law by the Editors Guild of India.

But the Union minister said state governments were responsible for preventing, detecting and investigating crimes committed within their jurisdiction.

In November, Tripura police invoked the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act against lawyers and journalists for allegedly disseminating distorted and objectionable material about violence in the state.

The violence in Tripura was sparked after attacks on Hindus in Bangladesh since October 13.

The Vishwa Hindu Parishad had organized a protest rally in the state on October 26, which led to violence and attacks on mosques as well as shops and houses of Muslims in Tripura.

During a tense situation in the state, police had claimed that the law and order situation in the state was “absolutely normal”. The force also claimed that no mosques had been burned down.

But a report by lawyers who were part of an investigation team said at least 12 mosques, nine shops, three homes of Muslims were targeted in the violence. He said the violence erupted due to “the irresponsibility of the administration, as well as extremist organizations and the vested interests of ambitious politicians”.

Tripura police had also arrested two HW News reporters while they were covering tensions. Samriddhi Sakunia and Swarna Jha have been accused of spreading communal discord while covering the violence.

They are also accused of “fabricating and concealing documents” on the recent violence, apparently as part of “a criminal conspiracy”. They were released on bail a week later.

On Tuesday, Thakur told Lok Sabha that the safety of journalists was important to the Center.

“An advisory specifically addressing the safety of journalists was issued to States/UTs on October 20, 2017, asking them to strictly enforce the law to ensure the safety and security of journalists,” he said.

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Government disagrees with India’s ranking in World Press Freedom Index: Minister I&B https://guwiv.com/government-disagrees-with-indias-ranking-in-world-press-freedom-index-minister-ib/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://guwiv.com/government-disagrees-with-indias-ranking-in-world-press-freedom-index-minister-ib/ The Center disagrees with the conclusions drawn by Reporters Without Borders on press freedom in India for various reasons, including the very small sample size and little or no emphasis on the fundamentals of democracy, the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting told Lok Sabha on Tuesday. In a written response to a question about India’s […]]]>

The Center disagrees with the conclusions drawn by Reporters Without Borders on press freedom in India for various reasons, including the very small sample size and little or no emphasis on the fundamentals of democracy, the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting told Lok Sabha on Tuesday.

In a written response to a question about India’s 142nd place out of 180 countries in the World Press Freedom Index, compiled and published by Reporters Without Borders this year, the Minister of Information and Broadcasting Anurag Thakur said the report editor’s adoption of the methodology is “questionable and non-transparent”.

“The World Press Freedom Index is published by a foreign non-governmental organization, Reporters Without Borders. The government does not share its views and country rankings and does not agree with the conclusions drawn by this organization for various reasons, including the very low sample size, little or no importance given to the fundamentals of democracy, adoption of a questionable and non-transparent methodology, absence of a clear definition of freedom of the press, among others “, did he declare.

The minister affirmed that the government is committed to guaranteeing the right to freedom of speech and expression enshrined in Article 19 of the Constitution of India.

Responding to questions about the safety and freedom of journalists as well as the Tripura police who recently arrested 102 people, including journalists, under the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act, he said: “The police and public order are subjects of the state under the Seventh Schedule of the Constitution of India, and state governments are responsible for prevention, detection, recording and investigation crimes and the prosecution of criminals through their law enforcement agencies.

The central government attaches “the utmost importance” to the safety and security of “all citizens of the country, including journalists”, he said.

“A notice specifically addressing the safety of journalists was sent to the States/UTs on October 20, 2017, asking them to strictly enforce the law to ensure the safety and security of journalists,” Thakur added.

(Only the title and image of this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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